Author Archives: Debbie Kinsella

could

Can or Could

Can or could

Deciding when to use can or could sometimes causes problems for English language students, especially as these words have a number of different uses.

can or couldCan or could can be used to talk about:

  • Possibility / Impossibility
  • Ability / no ability
  • To ask for / give permission
  • To give instructions / make requests
  • To make offers / give invitations

 

Here are some tips and practice exercises to help you decide when to use can or could.

 

Can or Could Tip 1: use can to talk about something that is possible (possibility)

  • It can get very busy at the park on a Saturday afternoon.
  • It can get so hot at my gym because they don’t have air-conditioning.

 

Can or Could Tip 2: could is used as the past tense of can. (past possibility)

  • It could get very busy at the park. It was so popular; I don’t know why they closed it!
  • It could get so hot at my gym because they didn’t have air-conditioning. I’m glad they have installed it now.

 

Can or Could Tip 3: could is used to show that something is possible in the future, but not certain.

  • We could go to beach tomorrow evening. Let’s see what the weather is like!
  • I’m going to take my cellphone with me when we go out, as James could call at anytime.

 

Can or Could Tip 4: use can’t (cannot) to show that something is impossible (impossibility).

  • She is such a nice person; I’m sure she wouldn’t do that. It can’t be true!

 

Can or Could Tip 5: use couldn’t (could not) to show that something was impossible (past impossibility).

  • Now we have all the facts we have evidence that those rumours couldn’t be true!

 

Can or Could Tip 6: use can to talk about ability, or can’t (cannot) to talk about lack of ability

  • I can sing quite well. (ability)
  • I can’t (cannot) play any musical instruments. (lack of ability)

 

Can or Could Tip 7: use could to talk about ability in the past, or couldn’t (could not) to talk about lack of ability in the past

  • Mozart could play the piano when he was three years old. (ability)
  • I couldn’t (could not) dance very well until I started having lessons. (lack of ability)

 

Can or Could Tip 8: use can or could to give instructions / make requests

Note: Could is more polite than can when you are telling / asking someone to do something.

  • Could you finish that as soon as you are able, please?
  • Can you finish that as soon as you are able, please? (less polite – can be used when talking to someone you know well, but it is better to use could in more formal situations or when talking to people you don’t know well)

 

  • Could you help me please?
  • Can you help me please? (less polite – can be used when talking to someone you know well, but it is better to use could in more formal situations or when talking to people you don’t know well)

 

Can or Could Tip 9: use can or could to make offers / give invitations

Note: we often use can in these situations, but could is also possible sometimes (more formal).

  • Can I help you with that?
  • Could I be of any assistance?
  • I can drive you to work tomorrow if you need a lift.
  • I could read through your report for you when you’ve finished if it would be helpful.

Now click here to try the practice exercises

reading_and_writers

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

phrasal verbs with 'read and write' exercisesComplete the phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

Example:

I love reading musicians’ autobiographies. It’s so interesting reading  ___________ their lives.

(a) about      (b) into     (c) over

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. I don’t know why you bother with James. He’s so selfish, if I were you I’d just write him  _______ !

(a) down      (b) over      (c) off

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

2. I think I’m too sensitive sometimes. I shouldn’t read so much  _________ other people’s behaviour.

(a) about      (b) into      (c) down

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

3. I have a lot of information to read  ______________ this evening, as I have an important presentation to make in the morning.

(a) down      (b) off      (c) up on

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

4. I can read _________ your report if you like . It can be difficult proof-reading your own work.

(a) about      (b) up on      (c) over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

5. I need to write _________ the notes I made in class today, then we can go for a coffee.

(a) up     (b) off      (c) over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

6. Jane wrote ___________ to the radio station and she has won three free tickets for the show!

(a) in      (b) up      (c) down

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

7. Can you write  _____________  everything we need in a shopping list or I’m sure I’ll forget something!

(a) in      (b) off      (c) down

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

8. The government has had to write  ________________ a huge amount of national debt this year because of the world wide recession.

(a) off      (b) down    (c) over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

too and enough

Too and Enough

Too and Enough

Too and enough are used to talk about the quantity or size of something.

too and enoughLook at the sentences below. What is the difference in meaning?

  • The dress is big enough.
  • The dress is not big enough.
  • The dress is too big.

 

Meaning of too and enough

We use ‘enough’ to show that size or quantity of something is suitable for the purpose.

  • The dress is big enough (the dress is the correct size to fit the person).

We use ‘not….. enough’ to show that quantity or size of something is not sufficient.

  • The dress is not big enough (the dress needs to be bigger to fit the person).

We use ‘too’ to show that there is a problem with the quantity or size of something.

  • The dress is too big (in this example, the dress needs to be smaller to fit the person).

 

 

Rules for using too and enough with adjectives

In our example sentences, we have used ‘too’ and ‘enough’ with the adjective big. Did you notice that we change the place of these words in the sentence?

  • Enough – ‘enough’ goes after the adjective – big enough
  • Not….. enough – ‘not’ goes before the adjective, ‘enough’ goes after the adjective – not big enough
  • Too – ‘too’ goes before the adjective – too big

 

Rules for using too and enough with nouns

 

Enough – ‘enough’ goes before countable and uncountable nouns.

  • There is enough food for the people at the party.
  • There are enough sandwiches for the people at the party.

Not….. enough – ‘not enough’ goes before countable and uncountable nouns.

  • There is not enough food for the people at the party.
  • There aren’t enough sandwiches for the people at the party.

Too much / too little – ‘too much / too little’ goes before uncountable nouns.

  • There is too much food for the people at the party.
  • There is too little food for the people at the party.

Too many / too few – ‘too many’ goes before countable nouns.

  • There are too many sandwiches for the people at the party.
  • There are too few sandwiches for the people at the party.

 

 

 

Rules for using too and enough with adverbs

Enough – ‘enough’ goes after the adverb.

  • My teacher speaks slowly enough for me to understand him.

Not….. enough – ‘not’ goes before the verb and adverb, ‘enough’ goes after the adverb.

  • My teacher doesn’t speak slowly enough for me to understand him.

Too – goes before the adverb.

  • My teacher speaks too quickly for me to understand him.

Rules for using too and enough with verbs

Enough – ‘enough’ goes after the verb.

  • I have studied enough today. Let’s go and watch a movie at the cinema!

Not….. enough – ‘not’ goes before the verb, ‘enough’ goes after the verb.

  • I haven’t studied enough today. I’m sorry I can’t go to the cinema.

Too much – goes after the verb.

  • I have studied too much today. I really need a break. Let’s go and watch a movie at the cinema!

Note: We don’t commonly use ‘too little’ with verbs, though it is possible.

Now practice!

Read the sentences below. Are too and enough used correctly?

1. He drives too fast! I’m worried he’ll have an accident one day.

Show answerThis is correct.

2. There are not enough milk. Could you get some when you go to the shops please?

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “There is not enough milk.”

3. Our house is big enough for our family, so we’re going to sell it and look for one with more space.

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “Our house isn’t big enough for our family”

4. I’ve too much eaten!

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “I’ve eaten too much.”

5. I don’t have enough time to finish my assignment! I’m getting really worried now.

Show answerThis is correct.

6. I think there are too much children in my son’s class at school.

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “I think there are too many children in my son’s class at school.”

7. My boss doesn’t give instructions enough clearly. I often don’t understand what I am supposed to do.

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “My boss doesn’t give instructions clearly enough.”

8. In my opinion, too little people donate money to charity.

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “In my opinion, too few people donate money to charity.”
reading_and_writers

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’

phrasal verbs with 'read and write'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are a few different phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’.

We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ examples

  • read about
  • read up on
  • read over
  • read (something) into (something)
  • write down
  • write up
  • write in (to something)
  • write off

 

‘read’ / ‘write’ (about) examples

  • read about (something)
  • write about (something)

This is the basic meaning. We read ‘about’ or write ‘about’ something to learn or share information.

1. Did you read about their wedding in the newspaper? They are two of my favourite celebrities.” (find out information about a topic through reading)

2. I’m writing about developments in the tourism industry for my college assignment.” (make a written record of information about a topic)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘read’ (up on) examples

  • read up on (something)

1. I don’t really know much about the company I have an interview with next week. I must read up on them before my interview. (research, find out more information with purpose)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘read’ (into) examples

  • read (something) into (something)

1. I’m sure you’re reading too much into the situation. I don’t think she’s angry with you, I think she’s just stressed because of her job. (make an assumption about something through feelings / intuition)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (down ) examples

  • write down (something) / write (something) down

1. I can’t remember information very well unless I write it down. (make notes, make a written record)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (up) examples

  • write up (something) / write (something) up

1. I’ve researched all the information I need, but I haven’t started writing up my report yet. (put something in to writing; e.g. a report, an assignment)

 

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (in) examples

  • write in (to something)

1. I write in to my favourite magazine quite often. I love it when they publish my letters. (write a letter to a newspaper, television company, or other organization, to express an opinion or ask something)

 

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (off) examples

  • write off (something – an object)

1. The insurance company has decided to write off my car as it was so badly damaged in the crash. (action taken by an insurance company when a vehicle or other object that is too badly damaged to be repaired.)

  • write off (something – a debt of asset)

2. Organisations are entitled to write off certain expenses that are required to run the business, or have been incurred in the operation of the business. (cancellation from an account of a bad debt or worthless asset)

  •  write off (someone / something)

3. Don’t write off Tom quite yet! He’s had a lot of bad luck lately and I’m sure he’ll be back to his normal self soon. (to give up on someone or something as a waste of time, hopeless case)

 

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises.

talk

Speak or talk

Speak or talk

Speak and talk are ‘say’ words. However, there are some differences in when and how we use speak or talk.

Read the tips below about when to use speak or talk then try the practice exercises.

 

speak or talkSpeak or Talk Tip 1: ‘speak’ (not talk) is used on the telephone

  • Who’s speaking please? I’ll put you through to Mr Jones now.
  • Who’s talking please? I’ll put you through to Mr Jones now.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 2: ‘speak’ (not talk) is used in relation to languages

  • I speak English, French and Italian.
  • I talk English, French and Italian.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 3: ‘speak’ is more formal than ‘talk’

Can you see the difference between these two sentences?

  • My teacher wants to speak to me after class.
  • Can I talk to you when you’re free?

 

We often use ‘speak’ when:

  • the situation is a formal situation;
  • we don’t know the person we are talking to very well; and / or
  • the subject to be spoken about is serious / formal.

 

We often use ‘talk’ when:

  • we are talking to someone we know quite well, or
  • we may not know the person all that well but the subject we want to talk about is not serious / formal.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 4: ‘speak’ is used in relation to one person (the speaker), ‘talk’ is used to in relation to more than one person (a conversation)

Can you see the difference between these two sentences?

  • The boss will be speaking later about the proposed changes to company policy.
  • In today’s meeting, the team will be talking about new ideas for next year.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 5: The noun form of the verb ‘talk’ is ‘talk’, the noun form of the verb ‘speak’ changes to ‘speech’

  • He will be making a speech  after dinner.
  • She is giving a talk this afternoon.

Note: a ‘speech’ is more formal than a ‘talk’.

Also note the differences: ‘make’ a speech / ‘give’ a talk.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 6: ‘speak’ and ‘talk’ prepositions

The sentences we have used as examples so far all use the preposition ‘to’: talk to (someone), speak to (someone).

To make the sentence more formal / polite, we can use the preposition ‘with’.

  • “I must speak with you about your performance at work as soon as you are available.”

We also use the preposition ‘about‘ to talk about the subject of the conversation / speech / talk.

  • He will be making a speech about climate change at the conference.
  • She is giving a talk about healthy eating this afternoon.
  • Can I talk to you about our holiday plans?
  • I must speak to you about your progress with that report.

Now practice!

Read the sentences below. Are they correct? Should we use speak or talk?

1. (on the telephone) “Hello, I’d like to make an appointment for a haircut please.” “Sure, who’s talking please?”.

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “Sure, who’s speaking please?”

2. He speaks Japanese fluently as he lived there for 10 years.

Show answerThis is correct.

3. ‘Hi, how are things? Are you free now? I want to speak with you about our plans for Saturday night.

Show answerThis is not correct. This is an informal situation involving people who know each other. It is better to say: I want to talk to you about our plans for Saturday night.

4. ‘Hello, it’s a pleasure to finally meet you. If you have some time I’d like to speak with you about a business proposal.

Show answerThis is correct.

5. It is a tradition for the groom, the bride’s father and the best man to give a speech at the wedding reception.

Show answerThis is incorrect. We should say ‘make a speech’ not ‘give a speech’.

6. We can speak about what food we need for the party later on.

Show answerThis is incorrect. The situation is informal involving a conversation. It is better to say: “We can talk about what food we need for the party later on.”

7. We have both lived in Australia, so we were talking to our experiences there.

Show answerThis is not the correct preposition. It should be: We have both lived in Australia, so we were talking about our experiences there.
phrasal verbs with 'put'

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘put’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

phrasal verbs with 'put' exercisesExample:

Could you please ___________ to your Finance Department?

(a) put me through      (b) put through     (c) putting me through

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. I love meat, but the thought of animals suffering really puts me _______ eating it.

(a) out      (b) back      (c) off

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

2. She can  _________ an excellent American accent but she’s actually from Australia.

(a) put on      (b) put out      (c) put off

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

3. Please  ______________ your wedding dress. I’d love to see what it looks like on you.

(a) put up      (b) put on      (c) put back

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

4. It really won’t _________ . I have plenty of time to drive you to town.

(a) not put me out      (b) put me out      (c) put you out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

5. I don’t know how you _________ his rudeness! I would have to say something if he spoke to me like that!

(a) put up with     (b) are putting up with      (c) put up

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

6. Campfires are allowed, but we must make sure we  put it  ___________ before we go to sleep.

(a) back      (b) off      (c) out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

7. We have a lovely guest room so we can always  _____________  visitors with no problem at all.

(a) put up with      (b) put on      (c) put up

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

8. I put her weight loss  ________________ all the exercise she’s been doing lately.

(a) on      (b) down to    (c) down

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

9. I don’t think it is very professional to ______________ the company’s policies to clients.

(a) put down      (b) put down to      (c) put off

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

10. We need to ______________  the party until next month as so many people can’t attend this weekend.

(a) put on      (b) put off      (c) put out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

11. It seems likely that the government will ______________  tax in the next Budget.

(a) put back      (b) put up      (c) put out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

 

12. I won’t have dessert thank you. I’m trying to avoid ______________  weight.

(a) put on      (b) not put on      (c) putting on

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)
phrasal verbs with 'put'

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’

phrasal verbs with 'put'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘put’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘put’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ examples

  • put through
  • put back
  • put down
  • put down to
  • put off
  • put on
  • put up
  • put up with
  • put out

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (through) examples

  • put (someone) through (to someone else)

1. “Can I speak to Mr Smith please?”  “Yes, please hold the line a moment. I’ll put you through to him now.” (connect a person to another person so they can talk on the telephone)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (back) examples

  • put back (something)

1. Today’s meeting has been put back to Friday as the Manager has been called away on urgent business. (postpone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (down) examples

  • put (someone) down

1. Sharon is always putting other people down; I wish she wouldn’t! (criticise in public)

  • put (something) down

2. I have put my name down on the volunteer list to help with the charity event! (write something, add to a listing)

  • put down (an animal)

3. My cat was very old and very sick so it was the kindest option to have him put down. (end the life of an old / sick / dangerous animal)

  • put down (something – prices)

4. The government is putting down the price of cigarettes from next week. (decrease)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (down to) examples

  • put (something) down to (something)

1. He is always so irritable these days. I put it down to the fact that he’s working too many hours. (give as an explanation to something)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (off) examples

  • put off (something)

1. We’ll have to put off our dinner date until next week as I’m so busy. (postpone)

  • be put off (something)

2. I was put off travelling there when I heard about the conflict. (feel negative about something that you used to like)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (on) examples

  • put on (weight)

1. I‘ve put on so much weight lately; I need to join a gym. (become heavier / fatter)

  • put on (something false)

2. They like to give the impression they are very rich but it’s all put on; I know they are actually struggling with cashflow. (pretend, deceive, create a false impression)

  •  put on (an item of clothing)

3. Put on a warm jacket before you go out. It’s freezing! (dress in an item of clothing)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (up) examples

  • put up (something – prices)

1. The government is putting up the price of cigarettes from next week. (increase)

  • put (someone) up

2. My cousin is coming to visit from America and we’re going to put him up while he’s in the UK. (provide hospitality to someone)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (up with) examples

  • put up with (something)

1. Parents of teenagers often have to put up with their bad moods. (tolerate, endure)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (out) examples

  • put (someone) out

1. We’d love to stay with you thank you. As long as it won’t put you out. (trouble or disturb someone)

  • put out (something that is burning)

2. Can you please put out that cigarette? You are not allowed to smoke here.

  • put out (a signal or broadcast)

3. The station put out such a strong signal that it interrupted all other broadcasts. (transmit)

 

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf
phrasal verbs with 'go'

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘go’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

phrasal verbs with 'go' exercisesComplete the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

Example:

Sorry for the interruption. Please  ___________ with your report.

(a) going on      (b) went on     (c) go on

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. They have _________ together for four years and have now decided to get engaged.

(a) going out      (b) been going out      (c) went out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

 

2. Don’t worry if you don’t understand everything right now, we will  _________ everything again before the meeting.

(a) go through with      (b) go with      (c) go through

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

3. I think you are so brave. I don’t think I could cope with what you have ______________.

(a) gone for      (b) gone with      (c) gone through

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

4. They have decided to _________ the redundancies despite pleas from staff.

(a) go through with      (b) go without      (c) go over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

5. I have brought along a bottle of white wine which will  _________ the chicken you’re cooking for dinner.

(a) go with     (b) be going with      (c) goes with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

6. The company is so unprofessional they have  _____________ every promise they made in the contract.

(a) went back on      (b) gone back on      (c) go back on

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

7. I’m sorry I can’t _____________ your plan; I just don’t agree with what you want to do and can’t offer you my support.

(a) go through      (b) go over      (c) go along with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

8. I should have time ________________ your work tomorrow. I’m sorry, I’m too busy today.

(a) will go over      (b) going over      (c) to go over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

phrasal verbs with 'go'

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’

phrasal verbs with 'go'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘go’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘go’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ examples

  • go out
  • go on
  • go on with (something)
  • go back on (something)
  • go for (something)
  • go over (something)
  • go through (something)
  • go through with (something)
  • go with (something)
  • go along with (something)
  • go without (something)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (out) examples

  • go out

1. The fire went out because they ran out of wood. (fire stops burning)

  •  go out (somewhere)

2. Are you going out anywhere this weekend? (going to a social activity)

  •  go out (with someone)

3. Did you know that Liam and Trudy are going out together? (boyfriend and girlfriend relationship)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (on) examples

  • go on

1. Please go on. I’m really interested in what you are saying. (continue)

  •  go on

2. What is going on? Please tell me all the news as I’ve been away. (occur)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (on with) examples

  • go on with (something)

1. The company intends to go on with the plan despite opposition from staff. (continue as planned)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (back on) examples

  • go back on (something – a promise or commitment)

1. I can’t trust him because he always goes back on his word. (fail to do something you have said you will do)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (for) examples

  • go for (something)

1. If you want the promotion, you should go for it! (try to achieve)

  •  go for (something)

2. I could really go for a cup of coffee right now! (desire / want / crave)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (over) examples

  • go over (something)

1. I’ll go over the main points of the meeting again to be sure everyone understands. (review)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (through) examples

  • go through (something)

1. Let’s go through your assignment together to check for errors. (examine, study carefully)

  •  go through (a situation / experience)

2. It’s hard to understand what someone who has a serious illness goes through unless you have experienced it yourself. (endure, experience difficulties)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (through with) examples

  • go through with (something)

1. He has decided to go through with the operation despite the risks. (proceed despite difficulties / hardship)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (with) examples

  • go with (something)

1. I don’t think that blouse goes with the skirt. (match or suit)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (along with) examples

  • go along with (something – an idea / plan)

1. I’m not convinced it will work but I’m willing to go along with your plan and see what happens. (offer support to, try something)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (without) examples

  • go without (something)

1. A camel is well suited to desert conditions as it can go without water for extended periods of time. (abstain from, not use)

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf
phrasal verbs with 'get'

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘get’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises.

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phrasal verbs with 'get' exercisesComplete the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

Example:

Jane is  ___________ food poisoning and will be back at work soon.

(a) getting over      (b) got over      (c) getting on

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. I don’t mean to  _________ you but you really need to help more with the housework!

(a) getting at      (b) get away with      (c) get at

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

2. We must  _________ Sean that taking his education seriously is so important!

(a) get through to      (b) get at      (c) get over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

3. It is shocking when people who commit serious crimes  _________ what they have done. Courts should be stricter.

(a) get over      (b) get away with      (c) get rid of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

4. If he doesn’t  _________ that report, he will never have it finished in time.

(a) gets on with      (b) get on with      (c) getting on with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

5. Don’t think you can   _________ doing the washing up. It’s your turn remember!

(a) be get out of      (b) getting out of      (c) get out of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

6. It is important to  _________ colleagues in the workplace even if you don’t always agree on everything.

(a) get along with      (b) get over      (c) get at

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

7. I hate having to _________ any of my books, but I don’t just don’t have room for all of them.

(a) get rid off      (b) get rid of      (c) getting rid of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

8. It can be very difficult to  _________ a divorce but most people find happiness again.

(a) get over      (b) get rid of      (c) get away with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

 

9. John will be in Italy now. I wonder what he  _________ ?

(a) gets up to      (b) be getting up to      (c) is getting up to

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)