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Level C1 Learning English through music 1

Level C1 Learning English through music 1

Level C1 Learning English through music 1

Adele – Rolling in the Deep

Level C1 Learning English through music 1Learning English through music is not only fun, it is very effective for improving your listening skills.

Play the video below and as you listen to the words (lyrics), complete the gap fill with the words you hear. When you are finished, click ‘Show answer’ to check your answers.

NOTE: There are TWO words required for each answer.

 

There’s a fire starting in
Show answer my heart

Reaching a , it’s bringing me out the dark
Show answer fever pitch

Finally I can see you
Show answer crystal clear

Go ‘head and sell me out and I’ll lay your ship bare
See how I leave with of you
Show answer every piece

Don’t underestimate the things that I will do

There’s a fire starting in my heart
Reaching a fever pitch
And it’s bringing me out the dark

The scars of remind me of us
Show answer your love

They keep me thinking that we almost had it all

The scars of your love, they breathless
Show answer leave me

I can’t help feeling
We could have had it all
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
Rolling in the deep
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
You had my heart inside of your hand
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
And you played it, to the beat
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)

Baby, I have to be told
Show answer no story

But I’ve heard one on you
And I’m gonna make your
Show answer head burn

Think of me in the depths of
Show answer your despair

Make a home down there
As mine sure won’t
Show answer be shared

(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
The scars of your love remind me of us
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
They keep me thinking that we almost had it all
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
The scars of your love, they leave me breathless
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
I can’t help feeling
We could have had it all
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
Rolling in the deep
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
You had my heart inside of your hand
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
And you played it, to the beat
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
We could have had it all
Rolling in the deep
You had my heart inside of your hand
But you played it, with a beating

Throw your soul through every (woah)
Show answer open door

Count your blessings to find what you look for (woah)
Turn into treasured gold (woah)
Show answer my sorrow

You’ll pay me back in kind and reap just what you sow (woah)
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
We could have had it all
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
We could have had it all
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
It all, it all, it all
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)

We could have had it all
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
Rolling in the deep
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
You had my heart inside of your hand
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
And you played it to the beat
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)

We could have had it all
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)
Rolling in the deep
(Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)
You had my heart inside of your hand
(You’re gonna wish you never had met me)

But you played it
You played it
You played it
You played it to the beat.

Show All correct answers

Did you know that Adele only quit smoking in 2015?

Level B2 Learning English through music 2

Level B2 Learning English through music 2

Level B2 Learning English through music 2

Pharrell Williams – Happy

Level B2 Learning English through music 2Learning English through music is not only fun, it is very effective for improving your listening skills.

Play the video below and as you listen to the words (lyrics), complete the gap fill with the words you hear. When you are finished, click ‘Show answer’ to check your answers.

It might seem what I’m about to say to you (1 word)
Show answer crazy

Sunshine she’s here, you can take a (1 word)
Show answer break

I’m a (3 words) that could go to space
Show answer hot air balloon

With the air, like I don’t (1 word), baby, by the way
Show answer care

Uh

[Chorus:]
Because I’m happy
Clap along if you feel like a room without a (1 word)
Show answer roof

Because I’m happy
Clap along if you feel like happiness is the (1 word)
Show answer truth

Because I’m happy
Clap along if you know what happiness is to you
Because I’m happy
Clap along if you feel like that’s what you wanna do

[Verse 2:]
Here come (2 words) talking this and that, yeah,
Show answer bad news

Well, give me all you got, and don’t (3 words), yeah,
Show answer hold it back

Well, I should probably (2 words) I’ll be just fine, yeah,
Show answer warn you

No (1 word) to you, don’t waste your time
Show answer offense Here’s why

[Chorus]

Hey
Go
Uh

(Happy)
Bring me down
Can’t nothing
Bring me down
My level’s too high
Bring me down
Can’t nothing
Bring me down
I said (let me tell you now)
Bring me down
Can’t nothing
Bring me down
My level’s too high
Bring me down
Can’t nothing
Bring me down
I said

[Chorus 2x]

Show All correct answers

Did you know that Pharrell Williams received only $2,700 for over 43 million streams of this song?

Level B2 Listening practice 1

Level B2 Listening practice 1

Test your listening skills with this listening exercise.

We strongly recommend that you do not pause the recording during this listening exercise. If you cannot answer all of the questions the first time, play the recording again.

Number of correct answers:

  • Level B2 Listening practice 11-3 correct: go back to Level A1 to build your skills.
  • 4-6 correct: you need more practice
  • 7-8 correct: well done!
  • 9-10 correct: great! You might be ready for Level C1

Background:
You will hear a speaker talking about train journeys in New Zealand and Australia.


Questions 1-10

Complete the tables below. If there is no information given, write X.
Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER for each answer.

Overlander
Distance / km (1)
Highlight 3 volcanoes
Time / hours 11

 

Transalpine
Distance / km 223
Highlight (2) 16
Time / hours (3)

 

Transcoastal
Distance / km (4)
Highlight (5)
Time / hours 5 hours

Show answer 11681 Show answer 12Tunnels Show answer 135 Show answer 14X (note that the instructions stated that ‘If there is no information given, write X.’ Show answer 15Whale watching

Questions 6 to 10

Complete the summary below USING NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS OR A NUMBER.

Taking three days to complete, the (6) Show answerIndian Pacific is one of the world’s longest train journeys. The Ghan is shorter, passing through towns built by the (7) . Show answerEarlier / early settlers There is also a sculpture designed to mark the laying of the (8) Show answerMillionth concrete sleeper. The Overland was the first train to travel between the capital cities in two (9) Show answerStates and it is also the oldest journey of its kind on (10) . Show answerThe continent

Show All correct answers

Click here to read the transcriptWhen thinking about beautiful countryside or stunning views, it has long been accepted that Australia and New Zealand have few equals. What is perhaps slightly less well known is what these countries can offer to the avid train enthusiast. Both countries have railways which pass through breathtaking scenery in the utmost of comfort.

In New Zealand you can travel from the country’s biggest city, Auckland, to where a third of the population lives, its capital, Wellginton, on the longest passenger rail service in the country – the Overlander. Crossing 681 kilometres, the train winds through the lush farmland of the Waikato and up the Rarimu Spiral onto an amazing ‘volcanic plateau’ surrounded by native bush. On a clear day you will be able to see three of New Zealand’s most famous volcanoes — Mount Ruapehu, Mount Ngauruhoe and Mount Tongariro. The whole journey can be completed in 11 hours, but for those keen to see a little more of the country, the trip can be extended over three or four days. This gives travellers the opportunity of seeing the famous Waitomo caves, relaxing in the mud pools of Rotorua, or skydiving over Lake Taupo.

Moving on to the South Island, you can take the Transai£i1ne through the Southem Alps, travelling from the South Pacific Ocean to the Ta an Sea. Climbing from Christchurch right into the alps, this 223 km trip is particularly impressive as the train passes through 16 tunnels before descending to Greymouth at the end of the line. Taking only five hours, this is a relatively short trip, but it is worth noting that this journey has been listed as the sixth most scenic rail route in the world. For those that are not so keen on mountains, the South Island has a second option —the Transcoastal. With the sea on one side and the mountains on the other, it again shows some of the best scenery New Zealand has to offer. Also taking five hours, one of the highlights of this journey is the opportunities for whale watching. The fortunate few that see whales are well rewarded, but there are more common sights which are just as enjoyable, such as penguins and seals.


Although these three train journeys are undeniably breathtaking, some travellers prefer the longer journeys on offer in Australia. The Indian Pacific, for example, which travels from Sydney through to Perth and has been dubbed ‘the adventure that spans Australia’. With three nights on board, the train takes in the Blue Mountains and the Nullarbor Plains, and, as the name implies, the Indian Pacific shows you two oceans. This train journey holds two world records: covering 4352 km, it is one of the world’s longest train journeys. it also travels the world’s longest straight stretch of railway track (478 km). For those who find these distances a little daunting, passengers can stretch their legs at a number of different stops such as Kalgoorlie, famous for gold, and Broken Hill, first founded as a silver mine.

If three days on board a train seems a little excessive, there are alternatives. The Ghan, for example, which travels from Adelaide in the south to Alice Springs in the centre of the continent, taking 20 hours. Passing through Crystal Brook, Port Augusta and Woomera, this journey gives an indication of what life was like for the earlier settlers as the discovered the country. Along the way. you can also see the Iron Man sculpture, F which was constructed by railway workers to commemorate the one millionth concrete sleeper laid during construction of the line.

Finally, just a quick word about the Overland, which runs between Melbourne and Adelaide. As the first train to travel between the capitals of two states, it is a historic as well as relaxing way to travel, and is famous for being the oldest long-distance train journey on the continent.

With so many memorable journeys to choose from, the only problem you will have is knowing which one to do first.

listening-test

Level A2 Listening practice 1

Level A2 Listening practice 1

Test your listening skills with this listening exercise.

We strongly recommend that you do not pause the recording during this listening exercise. If you cannot answer all of the questions the first time, play the recording again.

 

Number of correct answers:

  • Level A2 Listening practice 11-3 correct: go back to Level A1 to build your skills.
  • 4-6 correct: you need more practice
  • 7-8 correct: well done!
  • 9-10 correct: great! You might be ready for Level B1

Background:
You will hear 2 people. The woman works for a car rental company and the young man wants to rent a car.


Questions 1-10

Questions 1-5

Complete the form below.

Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER for each answer.

Northern Rental Bookings

Name: William (1)
Show answerWaddell (exact spelling required for this point)

Contact number: (2) 07
Show answer263 8666 (if you have this number in a different format, for example with different spacing, it would still be marked correct)

Address: 10 (3) Nelson
Show answerRobyn Place (exact spelling required for this point)

Payment by credit card type: (4) card.
Show answerVisa (‘credit’ is not enough to get this marked as correct)

Card No. 4550 1392 8309 3221

Card expiry date: July 20XX

Rental period: (5) days
Show answer10 (‘days’ is not required as this is included in the question)


Questions 6 to 10

Answer the following questions USING NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS OR A NUMBER

  1. How much is the car per day?
    Show answer$35
  2. What does the price include?
    Show answerUnlimited kilometres
  3. Who will he be visiting?
    Show answerRelatives
  4. What kind of car does the agent recommend?
    Show answer(An) automatic
  5. What does he need to collect the car?
    Show answerDriving license / Drivers license (‘a driving licence’ would be incorrect as this is three words when the instructions state ‘NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS’ )

 

Show All correct answers

Show the transcript
Receptionist Good morning, Sir. How can I help you?
William Hello. ls this Southern Rental Car?
Receptionist Yes. it is.
William I wonder if you could help me. I’m ringing from Nelson, but I’m coming over to Auckland
for 12 days and I’d like to hire a car
Receptionist Okay, I’ll fill in a booking for you now. First, can l take your name?
William Yes, it’s William Waddell.
Receptionist Sorry, could you spell your surname?
William Yes, it’s W A D D E L L
Receptionist Thanks. Now, can I have an address and a phone number?
William Sure. I live at 10 Robyn Place. That’s R O B Y N Place.
Receptionist And that’s Nelson, isn’t it?
William That’s right. Do you want my home number or my mobile?
Receptionist Home number will be fine.
William OK, it’s
Receptionist Great. Now, can I also have a credit card number?
William Do I have to pay by credit card?
Receptionist Well, we need to credit card number as a guarantee. It’s a standard policy for car rentals.
William OK, well I’ll pay by Visa then. The card number is 4550…1392…8309…3221
Receptionist And the expiry date?
William Sorry?
Receptionist Your card – when does it expire?
William Oh, next July.
Receptionist Right. Now, how long did you want the car for? Twelve days did you say?
William No, I only need the car for 10 days, from the 2nd to the 11th of next month.

Receptionist Now, what type of car are you looking to hire?
William Well, I’m not too worried about the model of the car but I understand that you have rental cars from just $25 a day. Is that correct?
Receptionist We do sometimes have the $25 deals, but only in the low season. For the period you are looking at, the cheapest we have is $35. However, that price includes unlimited kilometres.
William Sorry, did you say unlimited kilometres? What does that mean exactly?
Receptionist That means that no matter how far you go, the cost is the same. Some companies charge for rental and then charge again for every kilometre you actually drive.
William Well l am going to be travelling quite long distances – I’m visiting relatives and they live quite far apart from each other, so unlimited kilometres are probably a good idea.
Receptionist If you’re travelling long distances, you would be better off with an automatic. Changing gears in a manual can make it more expensive for petrol.
William OK, I’ll take an automatic then.
Receptionist Right, so that’s an automatic car for 10 days from the 2nd to the 11th. That’s all booked. Is there anything else I can help you with?
William No that’s fine. Oh, sorry – what do I need to bring with me when I pick up the car?
Receptionist All you need is your driving licence.
William Right, well thanks very much. Bye.
parts_of_speech

Parts of speech

Parts of speech

In order to improve your result in the IELTS test, both for speaking and writing, it is important to be aware of the ‘parts’ of speech that create sentences in English. It is commonly accepted that there are only 9* different parts of speech from which all sentences, phrases or utterances are made.

*Some schools believe that there are only 8 parts of speech, with articles being part of the adjective group.

Parts of speechThe different parts of speech are as follows:

  1. nouns
  2. verbs
  3. adverbs
  4. adjectives
  5. articles
  6. pronouns
  7. prepositions
  8. conjunctions
  9. interjections

Understanding which groups words are in can also help you to break down sentences, making the passive skills (reading and listening) easier.

Below is a table showing the different parts of speech and an example.

Parts of speech

Part of speech Common use Example
Verb to describe an action He sat.
Noun To describe a thing He sat on the chair.
Adverb To describe the verb He slowly sat on the chair.
Adjective To describe the noun He slowly sat on the tall chair.
Pronoun To talk about who He slowly sat on the tall chair.
Preposition To talk about where or when He slowly sat on the tall chair.
Conjunction Used to join ideas He slowly sat on the tall chair but fell off.
Article Used to give more information about the noun He slowly sat on the tall chair but fell off.
Interjection A short exclamation – not a full sentence Ouch! He hit the floor.

Improving your knowledge of English

It is also useful to keep a vocabulary list and group words together that come from the same parts of speech.

For example:

adjectives – e.g. glamorous

You should try to also learn their antonyms and synonyms to build your vocabulary.

e.g. alluring, attractive (synonyms) – dowdy, plain (antonyms)

and think about their comparatives and superlatives e.g. – (adj) more glamorous (comparative) the most glamorous (superlative)

nouns – e.g. accommodation

(check spelling and think about articles etc) – uncountable, no ‘a’ or ‘an’

You should try to also learn their synonyms to build your vocabulary.

e.g. place of residence, dwelling, abode (synonyms)

verbs – e.g. drive

(and their past and participle forms);

drove, driven

prepositions – e.g. on

(with examples of their different uses),

e.g. on the sofa, but in an arm chair.

conjunctions – e.g. moreover

(with examples of use and punctuation)

Smoking is expensive; moreover, it is detrimental to health.

Click here to try the parts of speech exercises.

louis-armstrong1

Level A2 Learning English through music 1

Level A2 Learning English through music 1

Louis Armstrong – Wonderful World

Level A2 Learning English through music 1Learning English through music is not only fun, it is very effective for improving your listening skills.

Play the video below and as you listen to the words (lyrics), complete the gap fill with the words you hear. When you are finished, click ‘Finish quiz’ to check your answers.

I see trees of 1.
Show answergreen ,

Red roses too

I see them bloom for me and 2.
Show answeryou

And I think to myself what a wonderful world.

I see skies of 3. and clouds of white
Show answerblue

The bright blessed day,

The 4. sacred night
Show answerdark

And I think to myself what a wonderful world.

The 5. of the rainbow
Show answercolours

So pretty in the sky

Are also on the 6. of people going by
Show answerfaces

I see friends 7. hands
Show answershaking

Saying how do you do

They’re really saying ‘I love you’.

I hear 8. crying, I watch them grow
Show answerbabies

They’ll learn much more

Than I’ll ever 9.
Show answerknow

And I think to myself what a wonderful world

10. I think to myself what a wonderful world
Show answerYes

Show All correct answers

Extend your English vocabulary #1

Extend your English vocabulary #1

EYV-fluctuateRegular posts with a new word, the pronuciation and example sentences.

Word: FLUCTUATE

Pronounced: FLUC-tu-ate (click below to listen)

 

Word type: verb (the noun is fluctuation)

Meaning: To rise and fall irregularly

Example: Exchange rates fluctuate every day, with the US dollar sometimes falling.

[wpw_follow_author_me author_id=”1″ disablecount=”true” followtext=”Click here to get new vocabulary and other updates sent directly to your inbox”][/wpw_follow_author_me]

 

inversion

Inversion

Inversion

inversionTo emphasise a particular part of a sentence, or to make your writing more literary (such as in a poem or novel), you can invert the traditional order of a sentence. For example:

Standard order – He didn’t realise he had been tricked until the following day.
Inverted order – Not until the following day did he realise he had been tricked.

It is common to invert sentence using negative, ‘restrictive’ words such as those in the list below:

hardly ever Hardly ever had there been such a shortage of water.
never Never had the President had to make such a difficult decision.
little Little did she know time was running out.
scarcely ever Scarcely ever have they had to wait for anything.
only by Only by learning to type will he improve in his job.
under no circumstances Under no circumstances is the prisoner to have visitors.
only in this way Only in this way can we be sure to avoid repeating the problem in the future.
on no account On no account is John to be given any money.
scarcely Scarcely has they left the building when the bomb went off.
not only Not only had he broken the law but he was also unrepentant.
seldom Seldom have I seen such wealth.
nowhere Nowhere else is there such an abundance of natural resources.
not until Not until the following day did he realise he had been tricked.
subjunctive

The subjunctive

The subjunctive

subjunctiveThe subjunctive is a grammar form that has no plural form or past form. It is generally used when something is considered important or desirable. It is part of a highly formal style of English often referred to as ‘The Queen’s English’.

For example:

  • It is essential that every child have educational opportunities.
  • It has been suggested that the company invest in new machinery.
  • The judge recommended that the prisoner stay in prison for at least 10 years.

Note that ‘do’ is not used in the negative form:

  • It is essential that every child not have to pay for educational opportunities.
  • It has been suggested that the company not invest in new machinery until next year.
  • The judge recommended that the prisoner not stay in prison any longer

 

The verb be is slightly different to other verbs in the subjunctive, because there is a different past tense form.

  • It is important that both parties be available to sign the documents
  • I wish it were the weekend!

There are also some fixed phrases that use the subjunctive form:

  • God save the the Queen (not saves)
  • Long live the King! (not lives)
  • God bless us all (not blesses)
  • Be that as it may…
school

Participle clauses

Participle clauses

participle clausesParticiple clauses are used in some tenses, but they also have another use – they can combine information into one sentence.

Participle clauses often express condition, reason, cause, result or time.

For example:

Jim walked past the old school. He got to the shop. > Walking past the old school, Jim got to the shop.

The section in bold is participle clause.

 

There are three types of participle clause:

Present participle Walking past the old school, Jim got to the shop.
Past participle Founded in 1912, the club has a long history.
Perfect participle After they had finished their homework, the boys went out to play.

 

Notes:

1. The participle clause and the main sentence must have either a cause/effect relationship or show a sequential relationship (one thing happened before the other).

Participle clause with a cause/effect relationship: Having studied hard, he passed the exam.

Participle clause with a sequential relationship: Locking the door, John walked to his car.

2. Both the clause and the main sentence normally need to have the same subject

Driving home, Mary thought about what she would cook for dinner (Mary was both driving and thinking about dinner)

 

Ready to test yourself? Take a look at these participle clause exercises!