Category Archives: Grammar

talk

Speak or talk

Speak or talk

Speak and talk are ‘say’ words. However, there are some differences in when and how we use speak or talk.

Read the tips below about when to use speak or talk then try the practice exercises.

 

speak or talkSpeak or Talk Tip 1: ‘speak’ (not talk) is used on the telephone

  • Who’s speaking please? I’ll put you through to Mr Jones now.
  • Who’s talking please? I’ll put you through to Mr Jones now.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 2: ‘speak’ (not talk) is used in relation to languages

  • I speak English, French and Italian.
  • I talk English, French and Italian.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 3: ‘speak’ is more formal than ‘talk’

Can you see the difference between these two sentences?

  • My teacher wants to speak to me after class.
  • Can I talk to you when you’re free?

 

We often use ‘speak’ when:

  • the situation is a formal situation;
  • we don’t know the person we are talking to very well; and / or
  • the subject to be spoken about is serious / formal.

 

We often use ‘talk’ when:

  • we are talking to someone we know quite well, or
  • we may not know the person all that well but the subject we want to talk about is not serious / formal.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 4: ‘speak’ is used in relation to one person (the speaker), ‘talk’ is used to in relation to more than one person (a conversation)

Can you see the difference between these two sentences?

  • The boss will be speaking later about the proposed changes to company policy.
  • In today’s meeting, the team will be talking about new ideas for next year.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 5: The noun form of the verb ‘talk’ is ‘talk’, the noun form of the verb ‘speak’ changes to ‘speech’

  • He will be making a speech  after dinner.
  • She is giving a talk this afternoon.

Note: a ‘speech’ is more formal than a ‘talk’.

Also note the differences: ‘make’ a speech / ‘give’ a talk.

 

Speak or Talk Tip 6: ‘speak’ and ‘talk’ prepositions

The sentences we have used as examples so far all use the preposition ‘to’: talk to (someone), speak to (someone).

To make the sentence more formal / polite, we can use the preposition ‘with’.

  • “I must speak with you about your performance at work as soon as you are available.”

We also use the preposition ‘about‘ to talk about the subject of the conversation / speech / talk.

  • He will be making a speech about climate change at the conference.
  • She is giving a talk about healthy eating this afternoon.
  • Can I talk to you about our holiday plans?
  • I must speak to you about your progress with that report.

Now practice!

Read the sentences below. Are they correct? Should we use speak or talk?

1. (on the telephone) “Hello, I’d like to make an appointment for a haircut please.” “Sure, who’s talking please?”.

Show answerThis is incorrect. It should be: “Sure, who’s speaking please?”

2. He speaks Japanese fluently as he lived there for 10 years.

Show answerThis is correct.

3. ‘Hi, how are things? Are you free now? I want to speak with you about our plans for Saturday night.

Show answerThis is not correct. This is an informal situation involving people who know each other. It is better to say: I want to talk to you about our plans for Saturday night.

4. ‘Hello, it’s a pleasure to finally meet you. If you have some time I’d like to speak with you about a business proposal.

Show answerThis is correct.

5. It is a tradition for the groom, the bride’s father and the best man to give a speech at the wedding reception.

Show answerThis is incorrect. We should say ‘make a speech’ not ‘give a speech’.

6. We can speak about what food we need for the party later on.

Show answerThis is incorrect. The situation is informal involving a conversation. It is better to say: “We can talk about what food we need for the party later on.”

7. We have both lived in Australia, so we were talking to our experiences there.

Show answerThis is not the correct preposition. It should be: We have both lived in Australia, so we were talking about our experiences there.
say-and-tell

Say or tell

Say or tell

Say and tell are similar in that they both mean to talk or give information to someone verbally. However, there are differences in sentence construction and exact meaning.

Can you see the difference between these two sentences?

  • John told me you were sick last week.
  • John said you were sick last me.

Fill in the gaps below with either ‘tell’ or ‘say’ to show the first rule:

You ________ someone something but you _________ something to someone.

Show answersYou TELL someone something but you SAY something to someone.

Say or tellHere some more examples:

Jane said she liked my new shirt > Jane told me that she liked my new shirt

His boss said David had to stay late > His boss told David that he had to stay late

She said she loved me! > She told me that she loved me!

 

Tip 1: Using ‘that’ with told

When using told, you do not have to say ‘that’. For example, both of these are correct:

Jane told me that she liked my new shirt > Jane told me she liked my new shirt

His boss told David that he had to stay late > His boss told David he had to stay late

She told me that she loved me! > She told me she loved me!

 

Tip 2: Direct and reported speech

When you are using reported speech, you can use say and tell.

For example:

He said he would be late home. CORRECT

He told me he would be late home. CORRECT

However, when you are using direct speech, tell is used only when giving a command or instruction.

‘Take seat over there’ he told me.  CORRECT

‘Take a seat over there’ he said. CORRECT

‘It’s good to see you’ he told me. INCORRECT

‘It’s good to see you’ he said. CORRECT

 

Tip 3: When the person being spoken to is not mentioned.

He said he needed another few days to finish the job. CORRECT

He told that he needed another few days to finish the job. INCORRECT

He told Bob that he needed another few days to finish the job. (We know the person being spoken to is Bob) CORRECT

 

Now practice!

Are the following sentences correct?

1. He told me I had to work on Saturday.

Show answerThis is correct.

2. Dave told that he would be here soon.

Show answerThis is not correct. It should be ‘Dave said that he would be here soon.’ or ‘Dave told me that he would be here soon.’

3. ‘I think you should leave’ he told.

Show answerThis is not correct. This should be ‘said’.

4. ‘I’ll miss you’ his girlfriend said.

Show answerThis is correct.

5. Tell him to come in if he has time.

Show answerThis is correct.

6. Tell him to come in if he has time.

Show answerThis is correct.

7. She told to me to stay after class.

Show answerThis is not correct. After tell you don’t use ‘to’.
your-youre

Your and you’re

Your and you’re

Your and you'reThis is one of the most common errors you will see on the internet, even when written by native English speakers. To begin, test yourself by deciding whether these sentences are correct or incorrect.

1. You’re looking very well – have you been on holiday? This is correct | This is not correct
Show answerThis is correct. See below for the explanation.

2. This is you’re final warning! This is correct | This is not correct
Show answerThis is not correct. See below for the explanation.

3. Your friend telephoned this morning. This is correct | This is not correct
Show answerThis is correct. See below for the explanation.

4. Your our teacher for the day, aren’t you? This is correct | This is not correct
Show answerThis is not correct. See below for the explanation.

 

Step 1: The first step towards using you’re and your correctly is to understand the difference between them.

You’re – this is a contraction of two words – you are (a subject and a verb)

Your – this is a possessive pronoun, showing belonging or ownership.

 

Step 2: The easiest way to check the correct form is to expand the contraction you’re into you are. Take a look at the sentences below.

1. You’re looking very well – have you been on holiday? > You are looking very well – have you been on holiday?

2. This is you’re final warning!  > This is you are final warning

 

Step 3: For your with meaning of possession or ownership, you should be able to replace Your with My and the sentence would still be correct.

For example:

3. Your friend telephoned this morning. > My friend telephoned this morning.

4. Your our teacher for the day, aren’t you?  > My our teacher for the day, aren’t you?

 

Now test yourself!

1. If you’re often tired, you should go to bed earlier.

Show answerThis is correct. Without the contraction, the sentence reads If you are tired

 

2. I think your smile is beautiful!

Show answerThis is correct. Changing your to my, this reads  I think my smile is beautiful.

 

3. I think your beautiful!

Show answerThis is NOT correct. Changing your to my, this reads  I think my beautiful. It should say ‘I think you are beautiful, so should be you’re

 

4. Our staff are available to answer your questions.

Show answerThis is correct. Changing your to my, this reads Our staff are available to answer my questions.

 

5. Your a lot like your brother in appearance, although you have very different personalities.

Show answerThis is NOT correct. Changing your to my, this reads My a lot like your brother in appearance…

 

6. I don’t think you’re being very kind.

Show answerThis is correct. Without the contraction, the sentence reads I don’t think you are being very kind.

 

7. Your going to have to leave soon, so you should get your coat on.

Show answerThis is NOT correct. Changing your to my, the sentence would read My going to have to leave soon, so you should get my coat on. The second your is correct, but the first one should be you’re.

 

8.  I have to say that you’re a terrible driver! Look at all the damage on your car!

Show answerThis is correct, as you can see by using the two techniques mentioned above. I have to say that you are a terrible driver! Look at all the damage on my car!

 

And to finish, here are some useful tips…

– If the word that follows is an article (a, an, the), then it should be you’re. Compare: You’re the best! Your the best!

– If the word that follows is an adjective (a describing word). then it should GENERALLY be you’re. Compare: You’re beautiful! Your beautiful.

commonly-confused-words

Commonly confused words – GOOD or WELL?

Commonly confused words – GOOD or WELL?

Even among native speakers, it can be common to hear these two words used incorrectly. Although ‘well’ has other meanings (regarding health or a place where fresh water can be had), the focus here is on the differences between good and well.

Good / Well

‘Good’ is an adjective (it helps describe something) and ‘well’ is an adverb (it helps describe how something is done).

Commonly confused words - GOOD or WELL?For example:

  • Living in an English speaking country is a good way to improve your language skills (‘good’ is describing the way of improving your language skills)
  • I performed well in my job interview (‘well’ is describing how the speaker performed).

Test yourself! Select the correct answer from the list for each gap

  1. It is important to eatif you want to be fit and healthy.
  2. He playedduring the tournament even though he lost.
  3. It’sto check your tyres before going on a long car journey.
  4. Eurgh! This is horrible! I thought you said the soup here was!
  5. Juan can speak English, but he is not soat writing.
  6. She is afriend – she’s always there when I need her.
  7. Most people do not sleep veryif they drink coffee just before they go to bed.
Click here to see the answers
1. It is important to eat WELL if you want to be fit and healthy.
2. He played WELL during the tournament even though he lost.
3. It’s GOOD to check your tyres before going on a long car journey.
4. Eurgh! This is horrible! I thought you said the soup here was GOOD!
5. Juan can speak English WELL, but he is not so GOOD at writing.
6. She is a GOOD friend – she’s always there when I need her.
7. Most people do not sleep very WELL if they drink coffee just before they go to bed.

 


 

participle-clauses-exercises

Participle clauses exercises

Participle clauses exercises

Before attempting these exercises, we recommend you take a look at the introductory lesson first. Click here to read the lesson.

Participle clauses exercisesRe-write the following into a single sentence using a participle clause.

NOTE: More than one answer may be possible. If you have a different answer to those given, post it in the comments section below and we’ll let you know.

1. Sue was lying in the sun. She got sunburned.

Show the answer

Lying in the sun, Sue got sunburned.

2. John has just retired. He is now able to spend more time gardening.

Show the answer

Having just retired, John is now able to spend more time gardening.

3. They bought their cinema tickets. Then they went to find a seat.

Show the answer

Having bought their tickets, they went to find a seat.

4. The student sat in front of the computer and wrote his essay.

Show the answer

Sitting in front of the computer, the student wrote his essay.

5. Some people argue against school uniforms. They feel children should wear what they want to.

Show the answer

Arguing against school uniforms, some people feel children should wear what they want to.

6. Some students are disappointed in their progress at school. These students often do not go into further education.

Show the answer

Disappointed in their progress at school, these/some students often do not go into further education.

7. Children do not have the maturity to make every choice themselves. A parent or guardian is need to make decisions on their behalf.

Show the answer

Not having the maturity to make every choice themselves, children need a parent or guardian to make decisions on their behalf.

7. I didn’t want to break the law. I called the police instead.

Show the answer

Not wanting to break the law, I called the police instead.

8. John travelled overseas a lot as a teenager. He is more open minded to different cultures.

Show the answer

Having travelled overseas a lot as a teenager, John is more open to different cultures.

adverbs in English

Adverbs in English exercises

Adverbs in English exercises

Have you read the information page on adverbs in English? Click here to read it before you try the adverbs in English exercises.

Complete the adverbs in English exercises below to test your knowledge of adverbs.

Example:

His speech is very slow.

He speaks very  __________________ .

He speaks very slowly.

adverbs in English exercisesAdverbs in English exercises

Complete the adverbs in English exercises below to test your knowledge of adverbs.

1. The rain is very heavy.

It is raining very ________________.

click here to see the answer
It is raining very heavily

 

2. She is a very quick thinker!

She thinks very _____________!

click here to see the answer
She thinks very quickly

 

3. Her dress is so elegant.

She dresses so ____________ .

click here to see the answer
She dresses so elegantly

 

4. He is so rude to customers!

He talks so  __________ to customers.

click here to see the answer
He talks so rudely to customers

 

5. The new manager is extremely pedantic.

The new manager acts extremely ________________.

click here to see the answer
The new manager acts extremely pedantically.

 

6. She was so excited when she was opening her presents!

She opened her presents so ____________________.

click here to see the answer
She opened her presents so excitedly

 

7. He is a very good writer – I love his books.

He writes very _______________ – I love his books.

click here to see the answer
He writes very well – I love his books.

 

8. She is usually early for meetings.

As always, she arrived _______________ for the meeting.

click here to see the answer
As always, she arrived early for the meeting.

 

9. He is such a fast runner!

He runs so _______________ !

click here to see the answer
He runs so fast!

 

10. He died in a tragic accident.

He died _______________ in an accident.

click here to see the answer
He died tragically in an accident.

 

11. I had done a lot of revision so I found the exam very easy.

I had done a lot of revision so I completed the exam _______________ .

click here to see the answer
I had done a lot of revision so I completed the exam easily.

 

12. Although very talented he is very humble when interviewed.

Although very talented he acts  _______________ when interviewed.

click here to see the answer
Although very talented he acts humbly when interviewed.
adverbs in English

Adverbs in English

Adverbs in English

adverbs in EnglishWe use adverbs in English to describe a verb.

Adverbs in English have different uses.

  • Adverbs of manner describe how something happens;
  • Adverbs of place say where something happens;
  • Adverbs of time say when or how often something happens; and,
  • Adverbs of probability describe how sure we are about something that happens.

Adverbs in English – adverbs of manner

We use adverbs of manner to say how something happens (or how something is done).

For example:

The people at the party were chatting happily.
He ate his lunch quickly so he could get back to work.

Adverbs in English – adverbs of place

We use adverbs of place to say where something happens:

I have arranged to meet her there.
We lived in Tokyo for two years.

Adverbs in English – adverbs of time

We use adverbs of time to say when or how often something happens:

He starts work at 8am.
They usually go to the cinema on Tuesday evenings.

Adverbs in English – adverbs of probability

We use adverbs of probability to show how sure we are about something that happens.

  • Maybe he‘ll call when he finishes work.
  • He is definitely coming for dinner on Saturday.

 

Forming adverbs in English

A lot of adverbs in English can be formed from the adjective by adding -ly.

For example:

  • hopeful – hopefully
  • definite – definitely
  • complete – completely

Though if the adjective ends in -y, it usually changes to -i.

For example:

  • happy – happily
  • easy – easily
  • pretty – prettily

Adjectives that end in -le change to -ly after a consonant when forming the adverb.

For example:

  • idle – idly
  • able – ably
  • humble – humbly

If the adjective form ends in -ic, in most cases you can add -ally to make the adverb.

For example:

tragic – tragically

periodic – periodically

Note: public – publicly is an exception to this rule.

 

Irregular adverbs in English

Here is a list of some commonly used adverbs that do not follow the rules above.

adjective adverb
good well – He teaches well. NOT goodly.
fast fast – He drives so fast. NOT fastly.
hard hard – He trains hard three nights a week. NOT hardly.
late late – He arrived late. NOT lately Note: ‘lately’ has a different meaning (recently) e.g. Have you seen her lately?
early early
daily daily
straight straight

Click here to try the adverbs in English exercises.

future and past

Future simple exercises

Future simple exercises

Have you read the information page on the future simple tense (‘will‘ and ‘(be) going to‘)? Click here to read it before you try the future simple exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

Complete the future simple exercises below with the ‘will‘ or ‘(be) going to‘ form to test your knowledge of the future simple tense.

future simple exercisesExample:

Person A: “I’m so hungry!”

Person B: “Are you? I __________________ (make) you a sandwich.”

Are you? I‘ll make you a sandwich.

Future simple exercises – ‘will’ and ‘(be) going to’

Complete the future simple exercises below using either the ‘will‘ or ‘(be) going to‘ form.

1. Do you think our new teacher ____________ (be) as nice as our old one?

click here to see the answer
Do you think our new teacher will be as nice as our old one? – ‘will’ for prediction

 

2. Take an umbrella with you when you go out. Look at the clouds it _____________ (rain)!

click here to see the answer
Look at the clouds it’s going to rain! – ‘going to’ for future based on present evidence

 

3. I heard last week that Susan has had a baby so I ____________ (visit) her tomorrow.

click here to see the answer
I heard last week that Susan has had a baby so I’m going to visit her tomorrow. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

4. Person A: “Can I speak to Sam please?”

Person B: “Sorry, he’s in a meeting.”

Person A: “Okay, I __________ (call) him again later.”

click here to see the answer
Okay, I’ll call him again later. – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

5. Jane _________ (be) 21 next week. Where has the time gone?

click here to see the answer
Jane will be 21 next week. – ‘will’ for future fact

 

6. Jane ____________ (have) a party; she sent out the invitations yesterday.

click here to see the answer
Jane is going to have a party. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

7. Person A: “I had a horrible day at work.”

Person B: “Did you? I _________ (take) you out for dinner, that should help to cheer you up!”

click here to see the answer
I’ll take you out for dinner, that should help to cheer you up! – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

8. I _________ (buy) a new car next week now I’ve saved enough money.

click here to see the answer
I’m going to buy a new car next week now I’ve saved enough money. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

9. We ___________ (probably / already / be) at the hotel by the time you arrive.

click here to see the answer
We will probably already be at the hotel by the time you arrive. – ‘will’ for prediction

 

10. He hasn’t studied at all. He __________ (not / pass) his exams!

click here to see the answer
He hasn’t studied at all. He isn’t going to pass his exams! – ‘going to’ for future based on present evidence

 

11. Person A: “Would you like tea or coffee?”

Person B: “I _________ (have) a cup of tea please.”

click here to see the answer
I’ll have a cup of tea please. – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

12. You are so lucky going on holiday to Greece! You ___________ (have) a lovely time.

click here to see the answer
You will have a lovely time. – ‘will’ for prediction

 

13. Sorry I can’t talk at the moment. I have to go, I ___________ (help) Nicola with her homework.

click here to see the answer
 I‘m going to help Nicola with her homework. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

14. I ___________ (send) you a text as soon as we arrive!

click here to see the answer
 I‘ll send you a text as soon as we arrive. – future promise.

 

15. Person A: “I don’t understand this question.”

Person B: “What is it? Let me have a look.  I __________ (help) you.”

click here to see the answer
I’ll help you. – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

16. The ground is so slippery. Be careful – you ___________ (fall over) in those shoes!

click here to see the answer
Be careful – you‘re going to fall over in those shoes! – ‘going to’ for future based on present evidence
conditional_sentences

Conditional sentences exercises

Conditional sentences exercises

Have you read the information page on conditional sentences? Click here to read it before you try the conditional sentences exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

conditional sentences exercisesComplete the conditional sentences exercises below to test your knowledge of conditionals.

1st conditional example:

If he __________________ (get) the job, he ___________ (be) very happy .

If he gets the job, he will be very happy.

 

Conditional sentences exercises – zero conditional

Complete the conditional sentences exercises below using the zero conditional form.

1. If you _____________ (heat) water to 100 degrees Celsius, it _____________ (boil).

click here to see the answer
If you heat water to 100 degrees Celsius, it boils.

 

2. If I _____________ (ask) my dog to sit, he _____________ (obey) me.

click here to see the answer
If I ask my dog to sit, he obeys me.

 

3. You _____________ (need) travel insurance if you _____________ (go) on holiday overseas.

click here to see the answer
You need travel insurance if you go on holiday overseas.

 

4. If people _____________ (not exercise), they _____________ (become) unfit.

click here to see the answer
If people don’t exercise, they become unfit.

 

5. I _____________ (feel) better if I _____________ (eat) well, .

click here to see the answer
I feel better if I eat well.

 

Conditional sentences exercises – first conditional

Complete the conditional sentences exercises below using the first conditional form.

6. If I _____________ (find) her phone number, I _____________ (send) it to you.

click here to see the answer
If I find her phone number, I will send it to you.

 

7. He _____________ (feel) ill if he _____________ (eat) all those sweets!

click here to see the answer
He will feel ill if he eats all those sweets!

 

8. If you _____________ (talk) to him, he _____________ (understand) your problem.

click here to see the answer
If you talk to him, he will understand your problem.

 

9. I _____________ (visit) you if I  _____________ (come) to your hometown next year.

click here to see the answer
I will visit you if I come to your hometown next year.

 

10. If she _____________ (finish) work late, she _____________ (meet) us at the restaurant.

click here to see the answer
If she finishes work late, she will meet us at the restaurant.

 

Conditional sentences exercises – second conditional

Complete the conditional sentences exercises below using the second conditional form.

11. If I _____________ (know) how to contact him, I _____________ (tell) him the news.

click here to see the answer
If I knew how to contact him, I would tell him the news.

 

12. If he _____________ (ask) her to marry him, she _____________ (say) ‘yes’.

click here to see the answer
If he asked her to marry him, she would say ‘yes’.

 

13. He _____________ (not make) so many mistakes if he _____________ (listen) to instructions.

click here to see the answer
He would not make so many mistakes if he listened to instructions.

 

14. I _____________ (buy) a boat if I _____________ (have) more money.

click here to see the answer
I would buy a boat if I had more money.

 

15. If he _____________ (try) it, he  _____________ (like) it!

click here to see the answer
If he tried it, he would like it!

 

Conditional sentences exercises – third conditional

Complete the conditional sentences exercises below using the third conditional form.

16. If I _____________ (see) him last week, I _____________ (invite) him.

click here to see the answer
If I had seen him last week, I would have invited him.

 

17. If I _____________ (know) you were in trouble, I _____________ (help) you.

click here to see the answer
If I had known you were in trouble, I would have helped you.

 

18. I _____________ (never met) you if  _____________ (not go) to that party!

click here to see the answer
I would never have met you if I hadn’t gone to that party!

 

19. If I _____________ (take) my car for a service, it  _____________ (not break down) last night.

click here to see the answer
If I had taken my car for a service, it would not have broken down last night.

 

20. She _____________ (not gone) there if I _____________ (warn) her.

click here to see the answer
She wouldn’t have gone there if I had warned her.

 

use_of_articles

Using articles in English – exercises

Using articles in English – exercises

Have you read the information pages on articles? Click here to read it before you try the articles exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

Complete the articles exercises below to test your knowledge.

Articles exercises practice (Level A1)

Complete the articles exercises by choosing the correct option (a), (b), (c) or (d) to complete each of the sentences with ‘a‘, ‘an‘, ‘the‘ or no article ‘Ø‘.

Using articles in English - exercises1. I am going shopping to buy ____ new jacket.

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is A.

 

2. That is ____ man I was telling you about.

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is C.

 

3. I read ____ brilliant book last week!

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is A.

 

4. I went to ____ great Italian restaurant last night.

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is A.

 

5. ____ town I grew up in is in the middle of England.

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is C.

 

6. Winston Churchill was ____ famous English Prime Minister.

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is A.

 

7. Could you lend me ____ jacket please? It’s so cold.

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is A.

 

8. ____ moon looks beautiful tonight; it’s so bright!

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is C.

 

9. I’ll pick you up in ____ hour.

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

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Correct answer is B.

 

10. I have two dogs. ____ smaller one is three years old

(a) a    (b) an   (c)  the   (d)  no article ‘Ø’

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Correct answer is C.