Category Archives: Level A2

listening-test

Level A2 Listening practice 1

Level A2 Listening practice 1

Test your listening skills with this listening exercise.

We strongly recommend that you do not pause the recording during this listening exercise. If you cannot answer all of the questions the first time, play the recording again.

 

Number of correct answers:

  • Level A2 Listening practice 11-3 correct: go back to Level A1 to build your skills.
  • 4-6 correct: you need more practice
  • 7-8 correct: well done!
  • 9-10 correct: great! You might be ready for Level B1

Background:
You will hear 2 people. The woman works for a car rental company and the young man wants to rent a car.


Questions 1-10

Questions 1-5

Complete the form below.

Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER for each answer.

Northern Rental Bookings

Name: William (1)
Show answerWaddell (exact spelling required for this point)

Contact number: (2) 07
Show answer263 8666 (if you have this number in a different format, for example with different spacing, it would still be marked correct)

Address: 10 (3) Nelson
Show answerRobyn Place (exact spelling required for this point)

Payment by credit card type: (4) card.
Show answerVisa (‘credit’ is not enough to get this marked as correct)

Card No. 4550 1392 8309 3221

Card expiry date: July 20XX

Rental period: (5) days
Show answer10 (‘days’ is not required as this is included in the question)


Questions 6 to 10

Answer the following questions USING NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS OR A NUMBER

  1. How much is the car per day?
    Show answer$35
  2. What does the price include?
    Show answerUnlimited kilometres
  3. Who will he be visiting?
    Show answerRelatives
  4. What kind of car does the agent recommend?
    Show answer(An) automatic
  5. What does he need to collect the car?
    Show answerDriving license / Drivers license (‘a driving licence’ would be incorrect as this is three words when the instructions state ‘NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS’ )

 

Show All correct answers

Show the transcript
Receptionist Good morning, Sir. How can I help you?
William Hello. ls this Southern Rental Car?
Receptionist Yes. it is.
William I wonder if you could help me. I’m ringing from Nelson, but I’m coming over to Auckland
for 12 days and I’d like to hire a car
Receptionist Okay, I’ll fill in a booking for you now. First, can l take your name?
William Yes, it’s William Waddell.
Receptionist Sorry, could you spell your surname?
William Yes, it’s W A D D E L L
Receptionist Thanks. Now, can I have an address and a phone number?
William Sure. I live at 10 Robyn Place. That’s R O B Y N Place.
Receptionist And that’s Nelson, isn’t it?
William That’s right. Do you want my home number or my mobile?
Receptionist Home number will be fine.
William OK, it’s
Receptionist Great. Now, can I also have a credit card number?
William Do I have to pay by credit card?
Receptionist Well, we need to credit card number as a guarantee. It’s a standard policy for car rentals.
William OK, well I’ll pay by Visa then. The card number is 4550…1392…8309…3221
Receptionist And the expiry date?
William Sorry?
Receptionist Your card – when does it expire?
William Oh, next July.
Receptionist Right. Now, how long did you want the car for? Twelve days did you say?
William No, I only need the car for 10 days, from the 2nd to the 11th of next month.

Receptionist Now, what type of car are you looking to hire?
William Well, I’m not too worried about the model of the car but I understand that you have rental cars from just $25 a day. Is that correct?
Receptionist We do sometimes have the $25 deals, but only in the low season. For the period you are looking at, the cheapest we have is $35. However, that price includes unlimited kilometres.
William Sorry, did you say unlimited kilometres? What does that mean exactly?
Receptionist That means that no matter how far you go, the cost is the same. Some companies charge for rental and then charge again for every kilometre you actually drive.
William Well l am going to be travelling quite long distances – I’m visiting relatives and they live quite far apart from each other, so unlimited kilometres are probably a good idea.
Receptionist If you’re travelling long distances, you would be better off with an automatic. Changing gears in a manual can make it more expensive for petrol.
William OK, I’ll take an automatic then.
Receptionist Right, so that’s an automatic car for 10 days from the 2nd to the 11th. That’s all booked. Is there anything else I can help you with?
William No that’s fine. Oh, sorry – what do I need to bring with me when I pick up the car?
Receptionist All you need is your driving licence.
William Right, well thanks very much. Bye.
future and past

Future simple exercises

Future simple exercises

Have you read the information page on the future simple tense (‘will‘ and ‘(be) going to‘)? Click here to read it before you try the future simple exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

Complete the future simple exercises below with the ‘will‘ or ‘(be) going to‘ form to test your knowledge of the future simple tense.

future simple exercisesExample:

Person A: “I’m so hungry!”

Person B: “Are you? I __________________ (make) you a sandwich.”

Are you? I‘ll make you a sandwich.

Future simple exercises – ‘will’ and ‘(be) going to’

Complete the future simple exercises below using either the ‘will‘ or ‘(be) going to‘ form.

1. Do you think our new teacher ____________ (be) as nice as our old one?

click here to see the answer
Do you think our new teacher will be as nice as our old one? – ‘will’ for prediction

 

2. Take an umbrella with you when you go out. Look at the clouds it _____________ (rain)!

click here to see the answer
Look at the clouds it’s going to rain! – ‘going to’ for future based on present evidence

 

3. I heard last week that Susan has had a baby so I ____________ (visit) her tomorrow.

click here to see the answer
I heard last week that Susan has had a baby so I’m going to visit her tomorrow. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

4. Person A: “Can I speak to Sam please?”

Person B: “Sorry, he’s in a meeting.”

Person A: “Okay, I __________ (call) him again later.”

click here to see the answer
Okay, I’ll call him again later. – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

5. Jane _________ (be) 21 next week. Where has the time gone?

click here to see the answer
Jane will be 21 next week. – ‘will’ for future fact

 

6. Jane ____________ (have) a party; she sent out the invitations yesterday.

click here to see the answer
Jane is going to have a party. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

7. Person A: “I had a horrible day at work.”

Person B: “Did you? I _________ (take) you out for dinner, that should help to cheer you up!”

click here to see the answer
I’ll take you out for dinner, that should help to cheer you up! – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

8. I _________ (buy) a new car next week now I’ve saved enough money.

click here to see the answer
I’m going to buy a new car next week now I’ve saved enough money. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

9. We ___________ (probably / already / be) at the hotel by the time you arrive.

click here to see the answer
We will probably already be at the hotel by the time you arrive. – ‘will’ for prediction

 

10. He hasn’t studied at all. He __________ (not / pass) his exams!

click here to see the answer
He hasn’t studied at all. He isn’t going to pass his exams! – ‘going to’ for future based on present evidence

 

11. Person A: “Would you like tea or coffee?”

Person B: “I _________ (have) a cup of tea please.”

click here to see the answer
I’ll have a cup of tea please. – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

12. You are so lucky going on holiday to Greece! You ___________ (have) a lovely time.

click here to see the answer
You will have a lovely time. – ‘will’ for prediction

 

13. Sorry I can’t talk at the moment. I have to go, I ___________ (help) Nicola with her homework.

click here to see the answer
 I‘m going to help Nicola with her homework. – ‘going to’ for plan / decision made before the time of speaking

 

14. I ___________ (send) you a text as soon as we arrive!

click here to see the answer
 I‘ll send you a text as soon as we arrive. – future promise.

 

15. Person A: “I don’t understand this question.”

Person B: “What is it? Let me have a look.  I __________ (help) you.”

click here to see the answer
I’ll help you. – ‘will’ for decision made at the time of speaking

 

16. The ground is so slippery. Be careful – you ___________ (fall over) in those shoes!

click here to see the answer
Be careful – you‘re going to fall over in those shoes! – ‘going to’ for future based on present evidence
adjective_order

Adjective order exercises

Adjective order exercises

Have you read the information page on adjective order? Click here to read it before you try the adjective order exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

Complete the adjective order exercises below to test your knowledge.

Adjective order exercises practice

Complete the adjective order exercises by putting the words into the correct order to make a correctly ordered sentence.

adjective order exercises1. red / drives / a / truck / Australian / he / big

click here to see the answer
He drives a big, red, Australian truck.

 

2. these / old / I / replace/ shoes / must / cheap

click here to see the answer
I must replace these cheap, old shoes.

 

3. such / old / a / man / he / is / kind

click here to see the answer
He is such a kind, old man.

 

4. lovely / is / she / a / wearing / red / dress / new

click here to see the answer
She is wearing a lovely, new, red dress.

 

5. a / meal / Indian / we / had / delicious

click here to see the answer
We had a delicious, Indian meal.

 

6.  lives / a / lovely / apartment / she / modern / in

click here to see the answer
She lives in a lovely, modern apartment.

 

7. garden / beautiful / he / porcelain / has / a / Italian / statue / in / his

click here to see the answer
He has a beautiful, Italian, porcelain statue in his garden.

 

8. dining / an / bought / wooden / antique / he / table

click here to see the answer
He bought an antique, wooden, dining table.

 

9. face / my / watch / has / red / a / round / big

click here to see the answer
My watch has a big, round, red face.

 

10. wearing / my / I / love / pants / black / comfortable / cotton

click here to see the answer
I love wearing my comfortable, black, cotton pants.

 

louis-armstrong1

Level A2 Learning English through music 1

Level A2 Learning English through music 1

Louis Armstrong – Wonderful World

Level A2 Learning English through music 1Learning English through music is not only fun, it is very effective for improving your listening skills.

Play the video below and as you listen to the words (lyrics), complete the gap fill with the words you hear. When you are finished, click ‘Finish quiz’ to check your answers.

I see trees of 1.
Show answergreen ,

Red roses too

I see them bloom for me and 2.
Show answeryou

And I think to myself what a wonderful world.

I see skies of 3. and clouds of white
Show answerblue

The bright blessed day,

The 4. sacred night
Show answerdark

And I think to myself what a wonderful world.

The 5. of the rainbow
Show answercolours

So pretty in the sky

Are also on the 6. of people going by
Show answerfaces

I see friends 7. hands
Show answershaking

Saying how do you do

They’re really saying ‘I love you’.

I hear 8. crying, I watch them grow
Show answerbabies

They’ll learn much more

Than I’ll ever 9.
Show answerknow

And I think to myself what a wonderful world

10. I think to myself what a wonderful world
Show answerYes

Show All correct answers

misspelled words

Commonly misspelled words in English

Commonly misspelled words in English

commonly_misspelled_words_in_EnglishEnglish spelling can be very difficult, even for native speakers. Many English words cannot be spelt phonetically (phonetically means the way they sound).

For example, phonetically the word enough should be spelt ‘enuff’!

Listed below are some of the most commonly misspelled words in English. If you think you know them, take a spelling test by clicking here.

If there are some words here that you have problems with, have a look at our tips for learning and remembering new vocabulary to help you. And remember, the only way to really improve is practice!

IMPORTANT NOTE: there are differences in spelling between US and UK English. This page (and this site) refers to British (UK English) spelling.

Commonly misspelled words in English

accelerate equipment noticeable
acceptable especially occasion
accidentally exceed occasionally
accommodate excellent official
accomplish exhilarate parallel
accumulate experience parliament
acquire explanation particular
acquit foreign perseverance
amateur grateful personnel
apparent guarantee possession
argument harass precede
atheist height preferable
beginning horrific privilege
believe hypocrisy proceed
business ignorance pronunciation
calendar imitate publicly
camouflage immediate receipt
candidate inadvertent receive
category incidentally recommend
changeable incredible reference
collectible independent referred
column indispensable relevant
commemorate ingenious remembrance
committed inoculate renowned
congratulations irresistible restaurant
conscience knowledge rhyme
conscientious labelled rhythm
conscious leisure ridiculous
consensus library schedule
deceive loose scissors
defendant maintenance separate
defiant millennium separately
definite miniature success
desperate mischievous tomorrow
disappear misspell twelfth
disappoint necessary vicious
embarrassment neighbour weird
connected_speech

Connected speech

Connected speech

Connected speechWhen you first hear an unfamiliar language, you don’t really hear individual words but rather a flow of sound – connected speech.

As you learn and become more familiar with a language and connected speech, you begin to hear individual words, partly because your teacher may speak more slowly and listening exercises are often slower than natural speech.

As you get better at speaking, to sound more natural, you need to learn how to use connected speech – this means connecting the words the way native speakers do.

This is one of the easiest and most effective ways to ‘neutralise’ an accent as it can help you build the same speech patterns as native speakers.

Here are some tips to help you!

Connected speech Rule #1

If a word ends on a consonant and the next word begins on a vowel, the consonant moves on to the vowel of the 2nd word.

Example:

word ends sounds like wor dends
green apples gree nappples

 

Connected speech Rule #2

If a word ends on an ‘ee’ sound and is followed by a word beginning with a vowel sound, we put both words together and add the letter ‘y’ in the middle.

thr ee eggs sounds like threeyeggs
H e asked Heeyasked

Connected speech Rule #3

If a word ends on an ‘oo’ sound and is followed by a word beginning with a vowel sound, we put both words together and add the letter ‘w’ in the middle.

bl ue eyes sounds like bloowise
Two onions Toowunions

 

adjective_order

Adjective order

Adjective order

adjective_orderAdjective order is important if you are using more than one adjective before a noun. There is often a specific order in which they must be placed. For example:

A black leather jacket Correct
A leather black jacket Incorrect

Here is a short acronym to help you remember:

OSASCOMP

opinion – size – age – shape – colour – origin – material – purpose

Below you will find an explanation for each letter and some example sentences.

Adjective Order Rule 1: OSASCOMP – O for opinion

Adjectives that talk about opinions, judgements or attitudes usually come first.

Opinions, judgements or attitudes Noun
a lovely jacket.
a perfect plate.
an expensive bike.

Adjective Order Rule 2: OSASCOMP – S for size

Adjectives relating to size, length and height come next. For example:

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Noun
a lovely large jacket.
a perfect big plate.
an expensive bike.

 

Adjective Order Rule 3: OSASCOMP – A for age

Next are any adjectives relating to age

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Noun
a lovely large new jacket.
a perfect big old plate.
an expensive modern bike.

Adjective Order Rule #4: OSASCOMP – S for shape

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Noun
a lovely large new jacket.
a perfect big old round plate.
an expensive modern bike.

Adjective Order Rule #5: OSASCOMP – C for colour

Next are the adjectives that talk about colour.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Noun
a lovely large new black jacket.
a perfect big old round white plate.
an expensive modern red bike.

 

Adjective Order Rule #6: OSASCOMP – O for origin

This refers to adjectives that say where the noun is from.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Origin Noun
a lovely large new black jacket.
a perfect big old round white Chinese plate.
an expensive modern red Italian bike.

Adjective Order Rule #7: OSASCOMP – M for material

This refers to what the noun is made of.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Origin Material Noun
a lovely large new black leather jacket.
a perfect big old round white Chinese porcelain plate.
an expensive modern red Italian bike.

 

Adjective Order Rule #8: OSASCOMP – P for purpose

This refers to what the noun is used for (e.g. wedding ring). They are often nouns used as adjectives.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Origin Material Purpose Noun
a lovely large new black leather jacket.
a perfect big old round white Chinese porcelain dinner plate.
an expensive modern red Italian sports bike.

Important notes:

1. The adjectives used in the tables above are examples only. It is uncommon in English to use more than three adjectives in the same sentence to describe a noun.

2. Some adjectives can be found in different positions, but if you follow the OSASCOMP rule you won’t be wrong!

Click here to try the adjective order exercises.

countable_uncountable_nouns

Make uncountable nouns countable

Make uncountable nouns countable

make _uncountable_nouns_countableNouns can be split into two different groups – countable and uncountable. (see Countable and uncountable nouns for more information)

Countable nouns, as the name suggests, can be counted. For example, you can have 1 pen or 2 pens, a car or some or a lot of cars.

However, uncountable nouns cannot be counted. For example, you cannot have 2 advices or some or a lot of advices.

However, there are two ways to make an uncountable noun countable.

How to make an uncountable noun countable method 1

Add a countable ‘container’ for the uncountable noun.

For example, milk is uncountable but bottles of milk can be counted. You can say a bottle of milk, 2 bottles of milk etc.

How to make an uncountable noun countable method 2

Use a countable form of the word.

For example, work is uncountable, but job is countable.

The table below shows more examples of how to make uncountable nouns countable.

Uncountable Countable
Advice A piece of advice – pieces of advice
Luggage A suitcase, a bag or a piece of luggage – suitcases, bags or pieces of luggage
money a note, a coin – notes, coins
cake a slice of cake, a piece of cake – slices or pieces of cake
furniture a table, a chair, a piece of furniture – tables, chairs, pieces of furniture
bread a slice of bread, a loaf of bread, a piece of bread – slices, loaves, pieces of bread
knowledge a fact – facts
travel a journey, a trip – journeys, trips
toothpaste a tube of toothpaste – tubes of toothpaste
wine a bottle of wine, a glass of wine – bottles of or glasses of wine
butter a pat of butter – pats of butter
cheese a slice of cheese, a chunk of cheese, a piece of cheese – slices, chunks or pieces of cheese
sugar a sugarcube, a spoonful of sugar, a bowl of sugar – sugarcubes, spoonfuls of sugar, bowls of sugar
Petrol (gas) a litre of petrol – litres of petrol.
Salt a pinch of salt – pinches of salt
soap a bar of soap – bars of soap
hair a strand of hair – strands of hair
glass a sheet of glass, a pane of glass – sheets or panes of glass
prepositions-time

Prepositions of time (A2)

Prepositions of time A2

prepositions-of-timePrepositions of time (and all types of prepositions) can be one of the hardest parts of English to use correctly because the rules are often quite difficult, and like most rules for a language, there are lots of exceptions.

In this lesson we will look at the prepositions of time ‘within’ and ‘before’.

Prepositions of time – within

WITHIN: We try to answer all emails within 24 hours.

‘Within’ is commonly used to express that something will be done inside or not later than the period of time stated.

Note: time given must be an amount of time, NOT a specific time in the future.

For example:

We try to answer all emails within 24 hours.

We try to answer all emails within the following day. Incorrect

 

Other uses could be: within the next few minutes, within the next week, within the next six months, within this financial year etc.

Prepositions of time – before

BEFORE: The repairs will be completed before Friday.

Before is also used to express that something will be done inside or not later than the time stated.

Note: the time given must be a specific future time. For example:

The repairs will be completed before Friday.Incorrect

We try to answer all emails before 24 hours. Incorrect

Other uses could be: before 1pm, before next week, before July, before the start of the next financial year etc.

Click here to try the Level A2 Prepositions of time exercises.

 

 

 

prepositions_of_place_2

Prepositions of place (A2)

Prepositions of place (A2)

prepositions_of_place_2Prepositions of place (and all prepositions) can be one of the hardest parts of English to use correctly because the rules are often quite difficult, and like most rules for a language, there are lots of exceptions.

In this lesson we will look at the prepositions of place ‘against’, ‘alongside’, ‘beside’, ‘by’ and ‘towards’.

Prepositions of place examples of use

AGAINST: having contact with something, touching.

  • ‘He put the bike against the wall.’
  • The dog leaned against its owner.’

ALONGSIDE: in parallel, like train tracks

  • ‘The horses worked alongside each other to pull the cart.’
  • It is a beautiful drive as the road runs alongside the coast.

BESIDE: at the side of, not necessarily touching.

  • ‘He put the book beside his bed.’
  • She sat beside an elderly man on the train.’

BY: in the area of

  • ‘I live by some shops and a library.’
  • If you go that way, you will drive by a park.’

TOWARDS: getting closer, aiming at each other

  • ‘The cars drove towards each other and only turned away at the last minute.’
  • He waved as he walked towards me.’

Click here to try the prepositions of place exercises.