Category Archives: Level A2

adjective_order

Adjective order exercises

Adjective order exercises

Have you read the information page on adjective order? Click here to read it before you try the adjective order exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

Complete the adjective order exercises below to test your knowledge.

Adjective order exercises practice

Complete the adjective order exercises by putting the words into the correct order to make a correctly ordered sentence.

adjective order exercises1. red / drives / a / truck / Australian / he / big

click here to see the answer
He drives a big, red, Australian truck.

 

2. these / old / I / replace/ shoes / must / cheap

click here to see the answer
I must replace these cheap, old shoes.

 

3. such / old / a / man / he / is / kind

click here to see the answer
He is such a kind, old man.

 

4. lovely / is / she / a / wearing / red / dress / new

click here to see the answer
She is wearing a lovely, new, red dress.

 

5. a / meal / Indian / we / had / delicious

click here to see the answer
We had a delicious, Indian meal.

 

6.  lives / a / lovely / apartment / she / modern / in

click here to see the answer
She lives in a lovely, modern apartment.

 

7. garden / beautiful / he / porcelain / has / a / Italian / statue / in / his

click here to see the answer
He has a beautiful, Italian, porcelain statue in his garden.

 

8. dining / an / bought / wooden / antique / he / table

click here to see the answer
He bought an antique, wooden, dining table.

 

9. face / my / watch / has / red / a / round / big

click here to see the answer
My watch has a big, round, red face.

 

10. wearing / my / I / love / pants / black / comfortable / cotton

click here to see the answer
I love wearing my comfortable, black, cotton pants.

 

louis-armstrong1

Level A2 Learning English through music 1

Level A2 Learning English through music 1

Louis Armstrong – Wonderful World

Level A2 Learning English through music 1Learning English through music is not only fun, it is very effective for improving your listening skills.

Play the video below and as you listen to the words (lyrics), complete the gap fill with the words you hear. When you are finished, click ‘Finish quiz’ to check your answers.

I see trees of 1.
Show answergreen ,

Red roses too

I see them bloom for me and 2.
Show answeryou

And I think to myself what a wonderful world.

I see skies of 3. and clouds of white
Show answerblue

The bright blessed day,

The 4. sacred night
Show answerdark

And I think to myself what a wonderful world.

The 5. of the rainbow
Show answercolours

So pretty in the sky

Are also on the 6. of people going by
Show answerfaces

I see friends 7. hands
Show answershaking

Saying how do you do

They’re really saying ‘I love you’.

I hear 8. crying, I watch them grow
Show answerbabies

They’ll learn much more

Than I’ll ever 9.
Show answerknow

And I think to myself what a wonderful world

10. I think to myself what a wonderful world
Show answerYes

Show All correct answers

misspelled words

Commonly misspelled words in English

Commonly misspelled words in English

commonly_misspelled_words_in_EnglishEnglish spelling can be very difficult, even for native speakers. Many English words cannot be spelt phonetically (phonetically means the way they sound).

For example, phonetically the word enough should be spelt ‘enuff’!

Listed below are some of the most commonly misspelled words in English. If you think you know them, take a spelling test by clicking here.

If there are some words here that you have problems with, have a look at our tips for learning and remembering new vocabulary to help you. And remember, the only way to really improve is practice!

IMPORTANT NOTE: there are differences in spelling between US and UK English. This page (and this site) refers to British (UK English) spelling.

Commonly misspelled words in English

accelerate equipment noticeable
acceptable especially occasion
accidentally exceed occasionally
accommodate excellent official
accomplish exhilarate parallel
accumulate experience parliament
acquire explanation particular
acquit foreign perseverance
amateur grateful personnel
apparent guarantee possession
argument harass precede
atheist height preferable
beginning horrific privilege
believe hypocrisy proceed
business ignorance pronunciation
calendar imitate publicly
camouflage immediate receipt
candidate inadvertent receive
category incidentally recommend
changeable incredible reference
collectible independent referred
column indispensable relevant
commemorate ingenious remembrance
committed inoculate renowned
congratulations irresistible restaurant
conscience knowledge rhyme
conscientious labelled rhythm
conscious leisure ridiculous
consensus library schedule
deceive loose scissors
defendant maintenance separate
defiant millennium separately
definite miniature success
desperate mischievous tomorrow
disappear misspell twelfth
disappoint necessary vicious
embarrassment neighbour weird
connected_speech

Connected speech

Connected speech

Connected speechWhen you first hear an unfamiliar language, you don’t really hear individual words but rather a flow of sound – connected speech.

As you learn and become more familiar with a language and connected speech, you begin to hear individual words, partly because your teacher may speak more slowly and listening exercises are often slower than natural speech.

As you get better at speaking, to sound more natural, you need to learn how to use connected speech – this means connecting the words the way native speakers do.

This is one of the easiest and most effective ways to ‘neutralise’ an accent as it can help you build the same speech patterns as native speakers.

Here are some tips to help you!

Connected speech Rule #1

If a word ends on a consonant and the next word begins on a vowel, the consonant moves on to the vowel of the 2nd word.

Example:

word ends sounds like wor dends
green apples gree nappples

 

Connected speech Rule #2

If a word ends on an ‘ee’ sound and is followed by a word beginning with a vowel sound, we put both words together and add the letter ‘y’ in the middle.

thr ee eggs sounds like threeyeggs
H e asked Heeyasked

Connected speech Rule #3

If a word ends on an ‘oo’ sound and is followed by a word beginning with a vowel sound, we put both words together and add the letter ‘w’ in the middle.

bl ue eyes sounds like bloowise
Two onions Toowunions

 

adjective_order

Adjective order

Adjective order

adjective_orderAdjective order is important if you are using more than one adjective before a noun. There is often a specific order in which they must be placed. For example:

A black leather jacket Correct
A leather black jacket Incorrect

Here is a short acronym to help you remember:

OSASCOMP

opinion – size – age – shape – colour – origin – material – purpose

Below you will find an explanation for each letter and some example sentences.

Adjective Order Rule 1: OSASCOMP – O for opinion

Adjectives that talk about opinions, judgements or attitudes usually come first.

Opinions, judgements or attitudes Noun
a lovely jacket.
a perfect plate.
an expensive bike.

Adjective Order Rule 2: OSASCOMP – S for size

Adjectives relating to size, length and height come next. For example:

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Noun
a lovely large jacket.
a perfect big plate.
an expensive bike.

 

Adjective Order Rule 3: OSASCOMP – A for age

Next are any adjectives relating to age

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Noun
a lovely large new jacket.
a perfect big old plate.
an expensive modern bike.

Adjective Order Rule #4: OSASCOMP – S for shape

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Noun
a lovely large new jacket.
a perfect big old round plate.
an expensive modern bike.

Adjective Order Rule #5: OSASCOMP – C for colour

Next are the adjectives that talk about colour.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Noun
a lovely large new black jacket.
a perfect big old round white plate.
an expensive modern red bike.

 

Adjective Order Rule #6: OSASCOMP – O for origin

This refers to adjectives that say where the noun is from.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Origin Noun
a lovely large new black jacket.
a perfect big old round white Chinese plate.
an expensive modern red Italian bike.

Adjective Order Rule #7: OSASCOMP – M for material

This refers to what the noun is made of.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Origin Material Noun
a lovely large new black leather jacket.
a perfect big old round white Chinese porcelain plate.
an expensive modern red Italian bike.

 

Adjective Order Rule #8: OSASCOMP – P for purpose

This refers to what the noun is used for (e.g. wedding ring). They are often nouns used as adjectives.

Judgements, opinions or attitudes Size, length, height Age Shape Colour Origin Material Purpose Noun
a lovely large new black leather jacket.
a perfect big old round white Chinese porcelain dinner plate.
an expensive modern red Italian sports bike.

Important notes:

1. The adjectives used in the tables above are examples only. It is uncommon in English to use more than three adjectives in the same sentence to describe a noun.

2. Some adjectives can be found in different positions, but if you follow the OSASCOMP rule you won’t be wrong!

Click here to try the adjective order exercises.

countable_uncountable_nouns

Make uncountable nouns countable

Make uncountable nouns countable

make _uncountable_nouns_countableNouns can be split into two different groups – countable and uncountable. (see Countable and uncountable nouns for more information)

Countable nouns, as the name suggests, can be counted. For example, you can have 1 pen or 2 pens, a car or some or a lot of cars.

However, uncountable nouns cannot be counted. For example, you cannot have 2 advices or some or a lot of advices.

However, there are two ways to make an uncountable noun countable.

How to make an uncountable noun countable method 1

Add a countable ‘container’ for the uncountable noun.

For example, milk is uncountable but bottles of milk can be counted. You can say a bottle of milk, 2 bottles of milk etc.

How to make an uncountable noun countable method 2

Use a countable form of the word.

For example, work is uncountable, but job is countable.

The table below shows more examples of how to make uncountable nouns countable.

Uncountable Countable
Advice A piece of advice – pieces of advice
Luggage A suitcase, a bag or a piece of luggage – suitcases, bags or pieces of luggage
money a note, a coin – notes, coins
cake a slice of cake, a piece of cake – slices or pieces of cake
furniture a table, a chair, a piece of furniture – tables, chairs, pieces of furniture
bread a slice of bread, a loaf of bread, a piece of bread – slices, loaves, pieces of bread
knowledge a fact – facts
travel a journey, a trip – journeys, trips
toothpaste a tube of toothpaste – tubes of toothpaste
wine a bottle of wine, a glass of wine – bottles of or glasses of wine
butter a pat of butter – pats of butter
cheese a slice of cheese, a chunk of cheese, a piece of cheese – slices, chunks or pieces of cheese
sugar a sugarcube, a spoonful of sugar, a bowl of sugar – sugarcubes, spoonfuls of sugar, bowls of sugar
Petrol (gas) a litre of petrol – litres of petrol.
Salt a pinch of salt – pinches of salt
soap a bar of soap – bars of soap
hair a strand of hair – strands of hair
glass a sheet of glass, a pane of glass – sheets or panes of glass
prepositions-time

Prepositions of time (A2)

Prepositions of time A2

prepositions-of-timePrepositions of time (and all types of prepositions) can be one of the hardest parts of English to use correctly because the rules are often quite difficult, and like most rules for a language, there are lots of exceptions.

In this lesson we will look at the prepositions of time ‘within’ and ‘before’.

Prepositions of time – within

WITHIN: We try to answer all emails within 24 hours.

‘Within’ is commonly used to express that something will be done inside or not later than the period of time stated.

Note: time given must be an amount of time, NOT a specific time in the future.

For example:

We try to answer all emails within 24 hours.

We try to answer all emails within the following day. Incorrect

 

Other uses could be: within the next few minutes, within the next week, within the next six months, within this financial year etc.

Prepositions of time – before

BEFORE: The repairs will be completed before Friday.

Before is also used to express that something will be done inside or not later than the time stated.

Note: the time given must be a specific future time. For example:

The repairs will be completed before Friday.Incorrect

We try to answer all emails before 24 hours. Incorrect

Other uses could be: before 1pm, before next week, before July, before the start of the next financial year etc.

Click here to try the Level A2 Prepositions of time exercises.

 

 

 

prepositions_of_place_2

Prepositions of place (A2)

Prepositions of place (A2)

prepositions_of_place_2Prepositions of place (and all prepositions) can be one of the hardest parts of English to use correctly because the rules are often quite difficult, and like most rules for a language, there are lots of exceptions.

In this lesson we will look at the prepositions of place ‘against’, ‘alongside’, ‘beside’, ‘by’ and ‘towards’.

Prepositions of place examples of use

AGAINST: having contact with something, touching.

  • ‘He put the bike against the wall.’
  • The dog leaned against its owner.’

ALONGSIDE: in parallel, like train tracks

  • ‘The horses worked alongside each other to pull the cart.’
  • It is a beautiful drive as the road runs alongside the coast.

BESIDE: at the side of, not necessarily touching.

  • ‘He put the book beside his bed.’
  • She sat beside an elderly man on the train.’

BY: in the area of

  • ‘I live by some shops and a library.’
  • If you go that way, you will drive by a park.’

TOWARDS: getting closer, aiming at each other

  • ‘The cars drove towards each other and only turned away at the last minute.’
  • He waved as he walked towards me.’

Click here to try the prepositions of place exercises.

future and past

Future simple tense

Future simple tense (will and be going to)

future-simple-tenseThe future simple tense has two forms in English – ‘will’ and ‘(be) going to’.

When you use the future simple tense to talk about the future , using ‘will’ or ‘(be) going to’ can alter the meaning of what you are saying.

Read the information below to see what the differences are and when to use which form of the future simple tense.

Future simple tense – differences between ‘will’ and ‘(be) going to’

will: will + (base form of the verb)
(be) going to: be (am, are is) + going to + (base form of the verb)

Will

1. To talk about a future ‘fact’.

The population of New Zealand will be 6 million by 20**.

2. To talk about something we have just decided to do (had no plan – decision made at the time of speaking).

Person A: “I feel really ill.’ Person B: Do you? I‘ll drive you home.

3. To make a promise.

I will love you forever.

(Be) going to

1. When we have evidence that something will happen (we can see something or know something that gives us evidence).

You’ve eaten so many chocolates! You are going to be sick!

2. To talk about something we will do in the future and have already planned

I’m going to have a holiday next week.

Future simple tense – will – more examples

Use #1: To talk about a future ‘fact’

‘The sun will rise at 6.10 a.m. tomorrow.’

Using ‘will’ means that this is fact.

Remember that a ‘fact’ can be subjective.

For example:

‘My team will win the World Cup’ is a ‘fact’ for the speaker, but not necessarily for the listener.

Use #2

A: “I have a headache!”
B: “Really? I will (I’ll) get you a tablet”

Speaker B has made a decision at the same time as speaking, so uses will.

I will remember and follow your advice!

Future simple tense – (be) going to – more examples

Use #1: When we have evidence (we can see something or know something) that something will happen in the future

Look at those clouds! It is going to rain!

We can say ‘going to’ because we have evidence – we can see the clouds.

Use #2: To talk about something we will do in the future and have already planned.

‘I’m going to have my hair cut tomorrow – I booked the appointment last week’

We say ‘going to’ because this must have been decided last week when the appointment was booked.


 

Compare:

A: I’m going to see that new film at the cinema today with John. (speaker is talking about something they will do in the future and have already planned)
B: But John can’t go – he asked me to tell you that he’s not feeling well.
A: Oh, OK. I‘ll go to the library instead then. (speaker is talking about something they have just decided to do (they had no plan – the decision was made at the time of speaking).

 

Click here and here to try the future simple exercises.

verbs_irregular

Irregular verbs list

Irregular verbs list

irregular_verbs_listIrregular verbs, as the name suggests, don’t follow a pattern. You simply need to learn them. In this lesson you will find an irregular verbs list. We suggest you try to learn a few each each day.

But before we look at an irregular verbs list, we need to think about how to form regular verbs. English verbs often end in +ed or +d when used in the past tense or participle form.

For example:

work – worked / live – lived

These are regular verbs.

Below you will find an irregular verbs list. Don’t try to learn them all at once! Go through the irregular verbs list until you get ten that you don’t know, then practice.

Irregular verbs list

Verb Simple Past Past Participle
A
arise arose arisen
awake awakened / awoke awakened / awoken
B
be was, were been
bear bore born / borne
beat beat beaten / beat
become became become
begin began begun
bend bent bent
bind bound bound
bite bit bitten
bleed bled bled
blow blew blown
break broke broken
breed bred bred
bring brought brought
build built built
burn burned / burnt burned / burnt
burst burst burst
buy bought bought
C
cast cast cast
catch caught caught
choose chose chosen
cling clung clung
come came come
cost cost cost
creep crept crept
cut cut cut
D
deal dealt dealt
dig dug dug
dive dove / dived dived
do did done
draw drew drawn
dream dreamed / dreamt dreamed / dreamt
drink drank drunk
drive drove driven
dwell dwelt / dwelled dwelt / dwelled
E
eat ate eaten
F
fall fell fallen
feed fed fed
feel felt felt
fight fought fought
find found found
flee fled fled
fling flung flung
fly flew flown
forbid forbade forbidden
forecast forecast forecast
forego forewent foregone
foresee foresaw foreseen
foretell foretold foretold
forget forgot forgotten
forgive forgave forgiven
forsake forsook forsaken
freeze froze frozen
G
get got got / gotten
give gave given
go went gone
grind ground ground
grow grew grown
H
handwrite handwrote handwritten
hang hung hung
have had had
hear heard heard
hew hewed hewn / hewed
hide hid hidden
hit hit hit
hold held held
hurt hurt hurt
I
inbreed inbred inbred
inlay inlaid inlaid
input input / inputted input / inputted
interbreed interbred interbred
interweave interwove / interweaved interwoven / interweaved
interwind interwound interwound
J
K
keep kept kept
kneel knelt / kneeled knelt / kneeled
knit knitted / knit knitted / knit
know knew known
L
lay laid laid
lead led led
lean leaned / leant leaned / leant
leap leaped / leapt leaped / leapt
learn learned / learnt learned / learnt
leave left left
lend lent lent
let let let
lie (ie ‘to lie down’) lay lain
lie (ie ‘to tell a lie’) lied lied
light lit / lighted lit / lighted
lose lost lost
M
make made made
mean meant meant
meet met met
mow mowed mowed / mown
N
O
P
partake partook partaken
pay paid paid
plead pleaded / pled pleaded / pled
proofread proofread proofread
prove proved proven / proved
put put put
Q
quit quit quit
R
read read (pronounced red) read (pronounced red)
rid rid rid
ride rode ridden
ring rang rung
rise rose risen
run ran run
S
saw sawed sawed / sawn
say said said
see saw seen
seek sought sought
sell sold sold
send sent sent
set set set
sew sewed sewn / sewed
shake shook shaken
shave shaved shaved / shaven
shear sheared sheared / shorn
shed shed shed
shine shined / shone shined / shone
shoot shot shot
show showed shown / showed
shrink shrank / shrunk shrunk
shut shut shut
sight-read sight-read sight-read
sing sang sung
sink sank / sunk sunk
sit sat sat
sleep slept slept
slide slid slid
sling slung slung
slink slinked / slunk slinked / slunk
slit slit slit
smell smelled / smelt smelled / smelt
sneak sneaked / snuck sneaked / snuck
sow sowed sown / sowed
speak spoke spoken
speed sped sped
spell spelled / spelt spelled / spelt
spend spent spent
spill spilled / spilt spilled / spilt
spin spun spun
spit spat spat
split split split
spoil spoiled / spoilt spoiled / spoilt
spread spread spread
spring sprang / sprung sprung
stand stood stood
steal stole stolen
stick stuck stuck
sting stung stung
stink stunk / stank stunk
strew strewed strewn
stride strode stridden
strike struck struck / stricken
strive strove / strived striven / strived
sunburn sunburned / sunburnt sunburned / sunburnt
swear swore sworn
sweat sweat / sweated sweat / sweated
sweep swept swept
swell swelled swollen / swelled
swim swam swum
swing swung swung
T
take took taken
teach taught taught
tear tore torn
tell told told
think thought thought
throw threw thrown
thrust thrust thrust
tread trod trodden / trod
U
understand understood understood
upset upset upset
V
W
wake woke / waked woken / waked
waylay waylaid waylaid
wear wore worn
weave wove woven
wed wed wed
weep wept wept
wet wet wet
win won won
wind wound wound
withdraw withdrew withdrawn
withhold withheld withheld
withstand withstood withstood
wring wrung wrung
write wrote written
X
Y
Z