Category Archives: Vocabulary

phrasal verbs with 'put'

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’

phrasal verbs with 'put'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘put’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘put’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ examples

  • put through
  • put back
  • put down
  • put down to
  • put off
  • put on
  • put up
  • put up with
  • put out

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (through) examples

  • put (someone) through (to someone else)

1. “Can I speak to Mr Smith please?”  “Yes, please hold the line a moment. I’ll put you through to him now.” (connect a person to another person so they can talk on the telephone)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (back) examples

  • put back (something)

1. Today’s meeting has been put back to Friday as the Manager has been called away on urgent business. (postpone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (down) examples

  • put (someone) down

1. Sharon is always putting other people down; I wish she wouldn’t! (criticise in public)

  • put (something) down

2. I have put my name down on the volunteer list to help with the charity event! (write something, add to a listing)

  • put down (an animal)

3. My cat was very old and very sick so it was the kindest option to have him put down. (end the life of an old / sick / dangerous animal)

  • put down (something – prices)

4. The government is putting down the price of cigarettes from next week. (decrease)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (down to) examples

  • put (something) down to (something)

1. He is always so irritable these days. I put it down to the fact that he’s working too many hours. (give as an explanation to something)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (off) examples

  • put off (something)

1. We’ll have to put off our dinner date until next week as I’m so busy. (postpone)

  • be put off (something)

2. I was put off travelling there when I heard about the conflict. (feel negative about something that you used to like)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (on) examples

  • put on (weight)

1. I‘ve put on so much weight lately; I need to join a gym. (become heavier / fatter)

  • put on (something false)

2. They like to give the impression they are very rich but it’s all put on; I know they are actually struggling with cashflow. (pretend, deceive, create a false impression)

  •  put on (an item of clothing)

3. Put on a warm jacket before you go out. It’s freezing! (dress in an item of clothing)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (up) examples

  • put up (something – prices)

1. The government is putting up the price of cigarettes from next week. (increase)

  • put (someone) up

2. My cousin is coming to visit from America and we’re going to put him up while he’s in the UK. (provide hospitality to someone)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (up with) examples

  • put up with (something)

1. Parents of teenagers often have to put up with their bad moods. (tolerate, endure)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (out) examples

  • put (someone) out

1. We’d love to stay with you thank you. As long as it won’t put you out. (trouble or disturb someone)

  • put out (something that is burning)

2. Can you please put out that cigarette? You are not allowed to smoke here.

  • put out (a signal or broadcast)

3. The station put out such a strong signal that it interrupted all other broadcasts. (transmit)

 

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf
phrasal verbs with 'go'

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘go’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

phrasal verbs with 'go' exercisesComplete the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

Example:

Sorry for the interruption. Please  ___________ with your report.

(a) going on      (b) went on     (c) go on

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. They have _________ together for four years and have now decided to get engaged.

(a) going out      (b) been going out      (c) went out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

 

2. Don’t worry if you don’t understand everything right now, we will  _________ everything again before the meeting.

(a) go through with      (b) go with      (c) go through

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

3. I think you are so brave. I don’t think I could cope with what you have ______________.

(a) gone for      (b) gone with      (c) gone through

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

4. They have decided to _________ the redundancies despite pleas from staff.

(a) go through with      (b) go without      (c) go over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

5. I have brought along a bottle of white wine which will  _________ the chicken you’re cooking for dinner.

(a) go with     (b) be going with      (c) goes with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

6. The company is so unprofessional they have  _____________ every promise they made in the contract.

(a) went back on      (b) gone back on      (c) go back on

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

7. I’m sorry I can’t _____________ your plan; I just don’t agree with what you want to do and can’t offer you my support.

(a) go through      (b) go over      (c) go along with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

8. I should have time ________________ your work tomorrow. I’m sorry, I’m too busy today.

(a) will go over      (b) going over      (c) to go over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

phrasal verbs with 'go'

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’

phrasal verbs with 'go'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘go’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘go’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ examples

  • go out
  • go on
  • go on with (something)
  • go back on (something)
  • go for (something)
  • go over (something)
  • go through (something)
  • go through with (something)
  • go with (something)
  • go along with (something)
  • go without (something)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (out) examples

  • go out

1. The fire went out because they ran out of wood. (fire stops burning)

  •  go out (somewhere)

2. Are you going out anywhere this weekend? (going to a social activity)

  •  go out (with someone)

3. Did you know that Liam and Trudy are going out together? (boyfriend and girlfriend relationship)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (on) examples

  • go on

1. Please go on. I’m really interested in what you are saying. (continue)

  •  go on

2. What is going on? Please tell me all the news as I’ve been away. (occur)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (on with) examples

  • go on with (something)

1. The company intends to go on with the plan despite opposition from staff. (continue as planned)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (back on) examples

  • go back on (something – a promise or commitment)

1. I can’t trust him because he always goes back on his word. (fail to do something you have said you will do)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (for) examples

  • go for (something)

1. If you want the promotion, you should go for it! (try to achieve)

  •  go for (something)

2. I could really go for a cup of coffee right now! (desire / want / crave)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (over) examples

  • go over (something)

1. I’ll go over the main points of the meeting again to be sure everyone understands. (review)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (through) examples

  • go through (something)

1. Let’s go through your assignment together to check for errors. (examine, study carefully)

  •  go through (a situation / experience)

2. It’s hard to understand what someone who has a serious illness goes through unless you have experienced it yourself. (endure, experience difficulties)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (through with) examples

  • go through with (something)

1. He has decided to go through with the operation despite the risks. (proceed despite difficulties / hardship)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (with) examples

  • go with (something)

1. I don’t think that blouse goes with the skirt. (match or suit)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (along with) examples

  • go along with (something – an idea / plan)

1. I’m not convinced it will work but I’m willing to go along with your plan and see what happens. (offer support to, try something)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (without) examples

  • go without (something)

1. A camel is well suited to desert conditions as it can go without water for extended periods of time. (abstain from, not use)

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf
phrasal verbs with 'get'

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘get’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

phrasal verbs with 'get' exercisesComplete the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

Example:

Jane is  ___________ food poisoning and will be back at work soon.

(a) getting over      (b) got over      (c) getting on

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. I don’t mean to  _________ you but you really need to help more with the housework!

(a) getting at      (b) get away with      (c) get at

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

2. We must  _________ Sean that taking his education seriously is so important!

(a) get through to      (b) get at      (c) get over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

3. It is shocking when people who commit serious crimes  _________ what they have done. Courts should be stricter.

(a) get over      (b) get away with      (c) get rid of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

4. If he doesn’t  _________ that report, he will never have it finished in time.

(a) gets on with      (b) get on with      (c) getting on with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

5. Don’t think you can   _________ doing the washing up. It’s your turn remember!

(a) be get out of      (b) getting out of      (c) get out of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

6. It is important to  _________ colleagues in the workplace even if you don’t always agree on everything.

(a) get along with      (b) get over      (c) get at

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

7. I hate having to _________ any of my books, but I don’t just don’t have room for all of them.

(a) get rid off      (b) get rid of      (c) getting rid of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

8. It can be very difficult to  _________ a divorce but most people find happiness again.

(a) get over      (b) get rid of      (c) get away with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

 

9. John will be in Italy now. I wonder what he  _________ ?

(a) gets up to      (b) be getting up to      (c) is getting up to

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)
phrasal verbs with 'get'

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

phrasal verbs with 'get'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘get’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘get’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ examples

  • get up to
  • get on with (something)
  • get on with / get along with (someone)
  • get over (something)
  • get over (someone)
  • get rid of (something)
  • get through to (someone)
  • get out of (doing something)
  • get away with (something)
  • get at (someone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (up to) examples

  • get up to

1. What have you been getting up to lately? (do)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (on with) examples

  • get on with (something)

1. Well it’s been nice talking to you but I really must get on with my homework now. (continue something you’ve started)

 

  • get on with (someone) / get along with (someone)

2. I get on with Simon really well. We have so much in common. (have a good relationship)

Note: To express the same meaning, you can also say: I get along with Simon really well. We have so much in common.

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (over) examples

  • get over (something)

1. I have finally managed to get over this terrible flu. I’ve been sick for weeks but feel better now. (recover from)

 

  • get over (someone)

2. I don’t think she will ever get over James. She loved him so much. (recover emotionally from losing someone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (rid of) examples

  • get rid of (something)

1. I need to get rid of a lot of my old clothes. They don’t fit me anymore. (dispose of)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (through to) examples

  • get through to (someone)

1. I have tried getting through to him, but he just won’t listen! (make someone understand an opinion / successfully explain)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (out of) examples

  • get out of (doing something)

1. I am going to try to get out of going to the meeting today. I’m so busy! (avoid doing something you don’t want to do)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (away with) examples

  • get away with (something)

1. I hope he doesn’t get away with breaking that window. He needs to be punished! (escape blame, punishment, or undesirable consequences)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (at) examples

  • get at (someone)

1. I’m sure the new boss doesn’t like me. She is always getting at me! (repeatedly criticise)

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf
phrasal verbs (take)

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘take’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘take’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘take’ exercises below to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

phrasal verbs with 'take' exercisesExample:

The plane took ___________ on time.

The plane took off on time.

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘take’ exercises below to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. I took _________ yoga a year ago and I’m so glad I did; it’s very relaxing.

click here to see the answer
I took up yoga a year ago and I’m so glad I did; it’s very relaxing

 

2. Do you have a pen? You need to make notes. There’s a lot of information to take _________.

click here to see the answer
Do you have a pen? You need to make notes. There’s a lot of information to take down.

 

3. If you would like to make a complaint, can I suggest you take it _________ with my manager.

click here to see the answer
If you would like to make a complaint, can I suggest you take it up with my manager.

 

4. I called the company but they aren’t taking  _________ any new staff at the moment.

click here to see the answer
I called the company but they aren’t taking on any new staff at the moment.

 

5. She definitely takes  _________ her Mum – they look so much alike.

click here to see the answer
She definitely takes after her Mum – they look so much alike.

 

6. Our boss is taking us all  _________ for lunch today to thank us for all our hard work.

click here to see the answer
Our boss is taking us all out for lunch today to thank us for all our hard work.

 

7. It’s very unprofessional for the boss to take his frustration  _________ on the team.

click here to see the answer
It’s very unprofessional for the boss to take his frustration out on the team.

 

8. We may need to take it _________ to see if we can fix it! I’ve got some spare parts here.

click here to see the answer
We may need to take it apart to see if we can fix it! I’ve got some spare parts here.

 

9. I think I can manage the extra responsibilities I have taken _______ especially as I will be working under a very experienced manager.

click here to see the answer
I think I can manage the extra responsibilities I have taken on especially as I will be working under a very experienced manager.

 

10. Take that _______ ! I don’t think what you said is true at all!

click here to see the answer
Take that back! I don’t think what you said is true at all!

 

11. Be careful when you take it _______ of the box, it’s very delicate.

click here to see the answer
Be careful when you take it out of the box, it’s very delicate.

 

12. I think I understand, it’s just such a lot to take _______.

click here to see the answer
I think I understand, it’s just such a lot to take in.
phrasal verbs (take)

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’

phrasal verbs with 'take'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘take’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘take’ are best used in spoken and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ examples

  • take off
  • take (something) off
  • take up (something)
  • take (something) up with (someone)
  • take (someone) in
  • take in (something)
  • take on (something)
  • take on (someone)
  • take over (something)
  • take after (someone)
  • take (something) apart
  • take (something) back
  • take down (something)
  • take (someone) out
  • take (something) out
  • take (something) out on (someone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (off) examples

  • take off

1. The plane took off on time. (leave the ground / depart)

2. The product really took off and exceeded expectations! (prove very popular / successful)

3. I’m sorry, I can only stay for half an hour then I have to take off. (leave – very informal)

 

  • take (something) off

4. Take your jacket off; it’s so warm on here! (remove a piece of clothing)

5. I had to take a week off work because I was very ill. (have time away from a job or activity)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (up) examples

  • take up (something)

1. I plan to take up golf soon as I need to spend more time outdoors! (start a new hobby)

 

  • take (something) up with (someone)

2. You really must take this problem up with your boss – you can’t continue to work under those circumstances! (raise an issue with someone / complain)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (in) examples

  • take (someone) in

1. She had nowhere to live so Sue kindly took her in. (give someone somewhere to stay)

2. I thought he was honest, but he wasn’t. He really took me in! (fool someone in a dishonest way)

 

  • take in (something)

3. Okay, give me a few minutes to read the information to be sure I take in all the details. (fully understand something)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (on) examples

  •  take on (something)

1. I shouldn’t have taken on the extra work. I’m so stressed and have no time to do everything! (commit to doing something)

 

  • take on (someone)

2. Our company has taken on four new employees this month. (employ)

3. England will take on New Zealand in an international rugby game this weekend. (compete against)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (over) examples

  • take over (something)

1. The Marketing Manager has taken over all responsibility for that. (take control)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (after) examples

  • take after (someone)

1. She takes after her sister in terms of her artistic talent. (share a similarity with an older family member)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (apart) examples

  • take (something) apart

1. He took the broken radio apart and put it back together again. It works fine now! (disassemble)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (back) examples

  • take (something) back

1. I took my new phone back to the shop because it was faulty. (return something to somewhere)

2. I take back the negative things I said about him. He’s actually a very nice man! (retract something said)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (down) examples

  • take down (something)

1.  I took down all the important details. (make notes)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘take’ (out) examples

  • take (someone) out

1.  My boyfriend is taking me out for dinner this evening. (date / pay for someone to go somewhere)

 

  • take (something) out

2.  I took the letter out of the envelope. (remove something from its place)

 

  • take (something) out on (someone)

3.  I know he’s upset about losing his job, but he shouldn’t take his anger out on me! (treat an innocent person badly because you feel angry / frustrated about something not connected to them)

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘take’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf

Extend your English vocabulary #1

Extend your English vocabulary #1

EYV-fluctuateRegular posts with a new word, the pronuciation and example sentences.

Word: FLUCTUATE

Pronounced: FLUC-tu-ate (click below to listen)

 

Word type: verb (the noun is fluctuation)

Meaning: To rise and fall irregularly

Example: Exchange rates fluctuate every day, with the US dollar sometimes falling.

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idioms

English idioms

English idioms

English idiomsEnglish idioms are used in speech or when writing informally. Many English speakers use idioms – certain phrases or expressions that may be difficult to understand.

English idioms are best used in a more ‘relaxed’ type of speech or communication.

English idioms are expressions that have a meaning of their own, and where understanding all of the individual words doesn’t necessarily mean you will understand an idiom.

For example, the idiom ‘a can of worms’ actually has nothing to do with cans or worms – it means when a decision or action produces considerable subsequent problems, often much more than was expected.

Here are some common English idioms though there are many, many more!

Idioms Description Example
At the drop of a hat Without hesitation, immediately. She would help me at the drop of a hat, she is such a great friend.
Beat around the bush  Avoid the important issue. Please don’t beat around the bush! Just tell me if there is something for me to worry about or not.
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush Having something for certain is better than risking it for more as you may lose both. John won $100 dollars at cards last night. They wanted him to gamble again to win more, but he decided that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush so he kept the money.
Blood, sweat and tears A lot of effort and hard work It took a lot of blood, sweat and tears for him to get to the top of the mountain.
Best of both worlds Have all advantages My job is both well paid and flexible – I have the best of both worlds.
Ball park figure A rough estimate; approximation They haven’t calculated precisely, but they suggested a ball park figure of nearly $2 million.
Catch someone red handed To see or catch somebody in the middle of commiting a crime. He was just climbing through the window with the jewellery in his pocket when the police arrived. He was caught red handed!
Catch 22 A frustrating situation – you cannot do the first thing until the second thing is done, but you cannot do the second thing unless the first is done. I can’t get a job without a driving licence, and I can’t afford a driving licence unless I have a job. It’s a Catch 22 situation.
Cut corners Something is not done properly (to save money) If they hadn’t cut corners, the accident wouldn’t have occurred.
Draw the line Deciding when a person or an action has gone too far. I don’t mind you borrowing the car, but I draw the line at you not returning it all weekend.
Devil’s advocate To present a counter argument. It’s good that he plays devil’s advocate – it makes us think about all possibilities.
Elbow grease Hard work or physical effort The best way to clean the floor is hot soapy water and a lot of elbow grease.
Far cry from  Very different from The reality of the situation is a far cry from what they wanted to achieve.
Give the benefit of the doubt Believe what someone says without proof  I always like to give people the benefit of the doubt – it’s better than not trusting anyone.
Get a kick out of (something) To find something funny or entertaining I really get a kick out of playing computer games.
Have a whale of a time To have a lot of fun.  I had a whale of a time at the party on Saturday!
In the heat of the moment Overwhelmed by present circumstances. She didn’t mean it, she said it in the heat of the moment.
Jump on the bandwagon Join a popular trend or activity. Other companies are jumping on the bandwagon as it is proving to be such a popular idea.
Judge a book by its cover To assume something based on appearance. “See that man over there, with the old t-shirt and torn jeans? He’s actually a millionaire!” “Really? Well, I guess you can’t judge a book by its cover!”
Keep (your) eye on the ball  To stay focussed, give something full attention. His boss advised him that he really needed to keep his eye on the ball if he wanted to succeed.
Let off steam Relieve strong / negative feelings without hurting others. I had to let off steam and tell them what I really thought rather than keep it all to myself.The children ran around in the playground and let off some steam after studying hard all morning.
Last straw Final problem in a series of problems This is the last straw! I need to leave and look for a new job, I’ve had enough.
Make up (your) mind To make a decision She still hasn’t decided what dress to wear – I wish she’d make up her mind!
On the ball  Understand a situation well  The new boss is so on the ball – he’s so efficient.
Once in a blue moon Happens very rarely.  You were so lucky to win that. That happens once in a blue moon!
Over the moon To be very excited or happy He had a new car for his birthday and he’s over the moon with it!
Piece of cake Done easily That exam was a piece of cake! I’m sure I’ve done well.
Pass the buck Not taking responsibility; passing the blame to someone else. Nobody admitted it was their fault – they just passed the buck and told me to contact customer service.
See eye to eye Be in agreement with someone  They have never seen eye to eye and are always disagreeing.
Sit on the fence Does not want to choose or make a decision. You really can’t sit on the fence, we need to know what you really think we should do.
To hear something straight from the horse’s mouth Hear something from someone of authority Don’t listen to office gossip, ask the boss and get the information straight from the horse’s mouth!

Click here to try the English idioms exercises.

misspelled words

Commonly misspelled words in English

Commonly misspelled words in English

commonly_misspelled_words_in_EnglishEnglish spelling can be very difficult, even for native speakers. Many English words cannot be spelt phonetically (phonetically means the way they sound).

For example, phonetically the word enough should be spelt ‘enuff’!

Listed below are some of the most commonly misspelled words in English. If you think you know them, take a spelling test by clicking here.

If there are some words here that you have problems with, have a look at our tips for learning and remembering new vocabulary to help you. And remember, the only way to really improve is practice!

IMPORTANT NOTE: there are differences in spelling between US and UK English. This page (and this site) refers to British (UK English) spelling.

Commonly misspelled words in English

accelerate equipment noticeable
acceptable especially occasion
accidentally exceed occasionally
accommodate excellent official
accomplish exhilarate parallel
accumulate experience parliament
acquire explanation particular
acquit foreign perseverance
amateur grateful personnel
apparent guarantee possession
argument harass precede
atheist height preferable
beginning horrific privilege
believe hypocrisy proceed
business ignorance pronunciation
calendar imitate publicly
camouflage immediate receipt
candidate inadvertent receive
category incidentally recommend
changeable incredible reference
collectible independent referred
column indispensable relevant
commemorate ingenious remembrance
committed inoculate renowned
congratulations irresistible restaurant
conscience knowledge rhyme
conscientious labelled rhythm
conscious leisure ridiculous
consensus library schedule
deceive loose scissors
defendant maintenance separate
defiant millennium separately
definite miniature success
desperate mischievous tomorrow
disappear misspell twelfth
disappoint necessary vicious
embarrassment neighbour weird