Category Archives: Vocabulary

reading_and_writers

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’

phrasal verbs with 'read and write'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are a few different phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’.

We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ examples

  • read about
  • read up on
  • read over
  • read (something) into (something)
  • write down
  • write up
  • write in (to something)
  • write off

 

‘read’ / ‘write’ (about) examples

  • read about (something)
  • write about (something)

This is the basic meaning. We read ‘about’ or write ‘about’ something to learn or share information.

1. Did you read about their wedding in the newspaper? They are two of my favourite celebrities.” (find out information about a topic through reading)

2. I’m writing about developments in the tourism industry for my college assignment.” (make a written record of information about a topic)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘read’ (up on) examples

  • read up on (something)

1. I don’t really know much about the company I have an interview with next week. I must read up on them before my interview. (research, find out more information with purpose)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘read’ (into) examples

  • read (something) into (something)

1. I’m sure you’re reading too much into the situation. I don’t think she’s angry with you, I think she’s just stressed because of her job. (make an assumption about something through feelings / intuition)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (down ) examples

  • write down (something) / write (something) down

1. I can’t remember information very well unless I write it down. (make notes, make a written record)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (up) examples

  • write up (something) / write (something) up

1. I’ve researched all the information I need, but I haven’t started writing up my report yet. (put something in to writing; e.g. a report, an assignment)

 

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (in) examples

  • write in (to something)

1. I write in to my favourite magazine quite often. I love it when they publish my letters. (write a letter to a newspaper, television company, or other organization, to express an opinion or ask something)

 

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘write’ (off) examples

  • write off (something – an object)

1. The insurance company has decided to write off my car as it was so badly damaged in the crash. (action taken by an insurance company when a vehicle or other object that is too badly damaged to be repaired.)

  • write off (something – a debt of asset)

2. Organisations are entitled to write off certain expenses that are required to run the business, or have been incurred in the operation of the business. (cancellation from an account of a bad debt or worthless asset)

  •  write off (someone / something)

3. Don’t write off Tom quite yet! He’s had a lot of bad luck lately and I’m sure he’ll be back to his normal self soon. (to give up on someone or something as a waste of time, hopeless case)

 

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘read and write’ exercises.

learning_new_vocabulary

10 tips for learning new vocabulary

10 tips for learning new vocabulary

Learning new vocabulary is crucial to improving your ability to communicate in English.

Linguists say that to ‘survive’ in any language, a speaker needs to have a vocabulary of about 120 basic words – this would enable you to do the basics like order food, give / understand directions etc.

10 tips for learning new vocabularyResearch shows that an average learner is capable or retaining 10-20 words per study hour. Assuming just 15 minutes of self-study per day, that would give a possible weekly vocabulary goal of 20-25 words and phrases.

Did you know that even a native speaker who has graduated from university still only has a vocabulary an average of about 30,000 words? Learning new vocabulary should be a life-long process for everyone!

Finding time to study, especially for people with full time jobs can be a challenge, but using certain stratagies can help to make learning new vocabulary easier and more enjoyable.

The video below has 10 useful techniques for learning new vocabulary.

If you follow these techniques, you will find that learning new vocabulary becomes more effective and your vocabulary will quickly expand.

Having a good vocabulary in English allows you to express yourself more clearly and accurately. The more you learn, the easier it becomes to expand your vocabulary.

Tip 1: Don’t try to learn too many new words at once

Making long lists of words is often not a very successful technique. Words and definitions can become mixed and confused. Focus on only 10 new words at one time, practicing and using them as much as possible. When you are confident you know them, find another 10 words and repeat the process.

Tip 2: Keep a vocabulary list

Make a short list of words that you want to learn, and keep that list with you wherever you go. A pocket-sized notebook, or the ‘notes’ function on a mobile phone, is a good way to start. You can also pin short lists of words around the house – above your bed, next to your computer, even in the back of the bathroom door! Keep your list well organised, with a clear structure. For example:

WORD WORD FAMILY SENTENCE
keyboard Noun I think it is easier to use a keyboard than write by hand.

 

You can also add a translation of the word in your own language, but be careful. Although this can be useful at a lower level of English, the more advanced your English becomes, the more you will find that words are not exact matches between languages, and you can miss subtle differences.

Tip 3: Use the words in a sentence

Research has proven that putting a word in context in a sentence is much more effective than trying to learn a word on its own. Create sentences that are true about you and your life. For example, if you were trying to learn the word ‘garden’, then think about where you live – do you have a garden? Does anyone you know have a garden that you like? Your example sentence should be about something personal to you.

Tip 4: Use a dictionary

Although this is an obvious tip, you can make a dictionary more effective for you by getting into the habit of looking up new words. We recommend using a paper dictionary, as you can then put a clear mark beside the word in a bright coloured pen and look through the dictionary from time to time refreshing your memory. If you find you have forgotten the word, put it back on your list and write another sentence to help you.

Tip 5: Test yourself

Free vocabulary tests are widely available on the internet, on this website and on our free app. You should also ask a friend to help you (if you followed Tip 4, you can hand them your dictionary and ask them to find a word you have marked and ask you for the meaning – or they can give you the meaning and you tell them the word).

Tip 6: Use the new word

When you learn a new word, it is common to find that you suddenly start hearing or seeing the word a lot more, and it becomes easier to remember. However, there are also times when you learn a new word and then don’t see it or use for a long time, and this will cause is to forget. One way to help you remember the word is to repeat it 5 or 6 times in a row, repeating this pattern every day for three or four days – this will help seal the new word in your long term memory.

Tip 7: Use word families

If you learn a new word – for example, happy – then find all the words in the same family (happily, happiness). That way you can quickly expand your vocabulary.

Tip 8: Read widely

This is definitely the best way to learn new words. It is also good practice to check what the word may mean in context.

Tip 9: Use a variety of ways to remember new words.

You don’t have to write new words to remember them. Some words are better drawn as pictures or acted out like a play, and flash cards, with the word on one side and a definition on the other, can also be very handy. Don’t feel you need to use the same techniques over and over again.

Tip 10: Find your vocabulary level

It can be helpful to find out your level of vocabulary, so you have some idea of what level you are. English vocabulary can be split into different levels, so take a look at the vocabulary section.

Commonly confused words – LISTEN or HEAR?

Commonly confused words – LISTEN or HEAR?

Although they have similar meanings, there are significant differences that you need to know!

Listen / Hear

We ‘listen’ to something when we focus on it and pay attention to it.

We ‘hear’ something that comes into our ears. It is not necessarily deliberate or intentional.

Commonly confused words - LISTEN or HEAR?For example:

  • I was trying to watch television but all I could hear was my neighbour playing his guitar.
  • I went outside so I could listen to my neighbour play his guitar

Test yourself! Select the correct answer from the list for each gap

  1. When you ask someone for directions, it is important towhat they are saying.
  2. Ia noise outside – perhaps you should go and take a look?
  3. I was trying toto the teacher’s instructions, but she has a very quiet voice and I couldn’ther.
  4. to that! It sounds like John’s car!
  5. Where I work, we canthe radio if we want to.
  6. I think there’s a storm coming – I justsome thunder.
  7. I was talking to friend who is overseas, but she couldn’tme because the phone line wasn’t clear.
  8. The problem with some people is they nevergood advice!
Click here to see the answers
1. When you ask someone for directions, it is important to LISTEN TO what they are saying.
2. I HEARD a noise outside – perhaps you should go and take a look?
3. I was trying to LISTEN TO the teacher’s instructions, but she has a very quiet voice and I couldn’t HEAR her.
4. LISTEN TO that! It sounds like John’s car!
5. Where I work, we can LISTEN TO the radio if we want to.
6. I think there’s a storm coming – I just HEARD some thunder.
7. I was talking to friend who is overseas, but she couldn’t HEAR me because the phone line wasn’t clear.
8. The problem with some people is they never LISTEN TO good advice!

 


 

commonly-confused-words

Commonly confused words – GOOD or WELL?

Commonly confused words – GOOD or WELL?

Even among native speakers, it can be common to hear these two words used incorrectly. Although ‘well’ has other meanings (regarding health or a place where fresh water can be had), the focus here is on the differences between good and well.

Good / Well

‘Good’ is an adjective (it helps describe something) and ‘well’ is an adverb (it helps describe how something is done).

Commonly confused words - GOOD or WELL?For example:

  • Living in an English speaking country is a good way to improve your language skills (‘good’ is describing the way of improving your language skills)
  • I performed well in my job interview (‘well’ is describing how the speaker performed).

Test yourself! Select the correct answer from the list for each gap

  1. It is important to eatif you want to be fit and healthy.
  2. He playedduring the tournament even though he lost.
  3. It’sto check your tyres before going on a long car journey.
  4. Eurgh! This is horrible! I thought you said the soup here was!
  5. Juan can speak English, but he is not soat writing.
  6. She is afriend – she’s always there when I need her.
  7. Most people do not sleep veryif they drink coffee just before they go to bed.
Click here to see the answers
1. It is important to eat WELL if you want to be fit and healthy.
2. He played WELL during the tournament even though he lost.
3. It’s GOOD to check your tyres before going on a long car journey.
4. Eurgh! This is horrible! I thought you said the soup here was GOOD!
5. Juan can speak English WELL, but he is not so GOOD at writing.
6. She is a GOOD friend – she’s always there when I need her.
7. Most people do not sleep very WELL if they drink coffee just before they go to bed.

 


 

phrasal verbs with 'put'

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘put’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

phrasal verbs with 'put' exercisesExample:

Could you please ___________ to your Finance Department?

(a) put me through      (b) put through     (c) putting me through

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. I love meat, but the thought of animals suffering really puts me _______ eating it.

(a) out      (b) back      (c) off

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

2. She can  _________ an excellent American accent but she’s actually from Australia.

(a) put on      (b) put out      (c) put off

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

3. Please  ______________ your wedding dress. I’d love to see what it looks like on you.

(a) put up      (b) put on      (c) put back

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

4. It really won’t _________ . I have plenty of time to drive you to town.

(a) not put me out      (b) put me out      (c) put you out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

5. I don’t know how you _________ his rudeness! I would have to say something if he spoke to me like that!

(a) put up with     (b) are putting up with      (c) put up

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

6. Campfires are allowed, but we must make sure we  put it  ___________ before we go to sleep.

(a) back      (b) off      (c) out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

7. We have a lovely guest room so we can always  _____________  visitors with no problem at all.

(a) put up with      (b) put on      (c) put up

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

8. I put her weight loss  ________________ all the exercise she’s been doing lately.

(a) on      (b) down to    (c) down

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

9. I don’t think it is very professional to ______________ the company’s policies to clients.

(a) put down      (b) put down to      (c) put off

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

10. We need to ______________  the party until next month as so many people can’t attend this weekend.

(a) put on      (b) put off      (c) put out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

11. It seems likely that the government will ______________  tax in the next Budget.

(a) put back      (b) put up      (c) put out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

 

12. I won’t have dessert thank you. I’m trying to avoid ______________  weight.

(a) put on      (b) not put on      (c) putting on

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)
phrasal verbs with 'put'

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’

phrasal verbs with 'put'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘put’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘put’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ examples

  • put through
  • put back
  • put down
  • put down to
  • put off
  • put on
  • put up
  • put up with
  • put out

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (through) examples

  • put (someone) through (to someone else)

1. “Can I speak to Mr Smith please?”  “Yes, please hold the line a moment. I’ll put you through to him now.” (connect a person to another person so they can talk on the telephone)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (back) examples

  • put back (something)

1. Today’s meeting has been put back to Friday as the Manager has been called away on urgent business. (postpone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (down) examples

  • put (someone) down

1. Sharon is always putting other people down; I wish she wouldn’t! (criticise in public)

  • put (something) down

2. I have put my name down on the volunteer list to help with the charity event! (write something, add to a listing)

  • put down (an animal)

3. My cat was very old and very sick so it was the kindest option to have him put down. (end the life of an old / sick / dangerous animal)

  • put down (something – prices)

4. The government is putting down the price of cigarettes from next week. (decrease)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (down to) examples

  • put (something) down to (something)

1. He is always so irritable these days. I put it down to the fact that he’s working too many hours. (give as an explanation to something)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (off) examples

  • put off (something)

1. We’ll have to put off our dinner date until next week as I’m so busy. (postpone)

  • be put off (something)

2. I was put off travelling there when I heard about the conflict. (feel negative about something that you used to like)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (on) examples

  • put on (weight)

1. I‘ve put on so much weight lately; I need to join a gym. (become heavier / fatter)

  • put on (something false)

2. They like to give the impression they are very rich but it’s all put on; I know they are actually struggling with cashflow. (pretend, deceive, create a false impression)

  •  put on (an item of clothing)

3. Put on a warm jacket before you go out. It’s freezing! (dress in an item of clothing)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (up) examples

  • put up (something – prices)

1. The government is putting up the price of cigarettes from next week. (increase)

  • put (someone) up

2. My cousin is coming to visit from America and we’re going to put him up while he’s in the UK. (provide hospitality to someone)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (up with) examples

  • put up with (something)

1. Parents of teenagers often have to put up with their bad moods. (tolerate, endure)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘put’ (out) examples

  • put (someone) out

1. We’d love to stay with you thank you. As long as it won’t put you out. (trouble or disturb someone)

  • put out (something that is burning)

2. Can you please put out that cigarette? You are not allowed to smoke here.

  • put out (a signal or broadcast)

3. The station put out such a strong signal that it interrupted all other broadcasts. (transmit)

 

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘put’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf
phrasal verbs with 'go'

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘go’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

phrasal verbs with 'go' exercisesComplete the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

Example:

Sorry for the interruption. Please  ___________ with your report.

(a) going on      (b) went on     (c) go on

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. They have _________ together for four years and have now decided to get engaged.

(a) going out      (b) been going out      (c) went out

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

 

2. Don’t worry if you don’t understand everything right now, we will  _________ everything again before the meeting.

(a) go through with      (b) go with      (c) go through

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

3. I think you are so brave. I don’t think I could cope with what you have ______________.

(a) gone for      (b) gone with      (c) gone through

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

4. They have decided to _________ the redundancies despite pleas from staff.

(a) go through with      (b) go without      (c) go over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

5. I have brought along a bottle of white wine which will  _________ the chicken you’re cooking for dinner.

(a) go with     (b) be going with      (c) goes with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

6. The company is so unprofessional they have  _____________ every promise they made in the contract.

(a) went back on      (b) gone back on      (c) go back on

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

7. I’m sorry I can’t _____________ your plan; I just don’t agree with what you want to do and can’t offer you my support.

(a) go through      (b) go over      (c) go along with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

8. I should have time ________________ your work tomorrow. I’m sorry, I’m too busy today.

(a) will go over      (b) going over      (c) to go over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

phrasal verbs with 'go'

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’

phrasal verbs with 'go'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘go’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘go’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ examples

  • go out
  • go on
  • go on with (something)
  • go back on (something)
  • go for (something)
  • go over (something)
  • go through (something)
  • go through with (something)
  • go with (something)
  • go along with (something)
  • go without (something)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (out) examples

  • go out

1. The fire went out because they ran out of wood. (fire stops burning)

  •  go out (somewhere)

2. Are you going out anywhere this weekend? (going to a social activity)

  •  go out (with someone)

3. Did you know that Liam and Trudy are going out together? (boyfriend and girlfriend relationship)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (on) examples

  • go on

1. Please go on. I’m really interested in what you are saying. (continue)

  •  go on

2. What is going on? Please tell me all the news as I’ve been away. (occur)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (on with) examples

  • go on with (something)

1. The company intends to go on with the plan despite opposition from staff. (continue as planned)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (back on) examples

  • go back on (something – a promise or commitment)

1. I can’t trust him because he always goes back on his word. (fail to do something you have said you will do)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (for) examples

  • go for (something)

1. If you want the promotion, you should go for it! (try to achieve)

  •  go for (something)

2. I could really go for a cup of coffee right now! (desire / want / crave)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (over) examples

  • go over (something)

1. I’ll go over the main points of the meeting again to be sure everyone understands. (review)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (through) examples

  • go through (something)

1. Let’s go through your assignment together to check for errors. (examine, study carefully)

  •  go through (a situation / experience)

2. It’s hard to understand what someone who has a serious illness goes through unless you have experienced it yourself. (endure, experience difficulties)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (through with) examples

  • go through with (something)

1. He has decided to go through with the operation despite the risks. (proceed despite difficulties / hardship)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (with) examples

  • go with (something)

1. I don’t think that blouse goes with the skirt. (match or suit)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (along with) examples

  • go along with (something – an idea / plan)

1. I’m not convinced it will work but I’m willing to go along with your plan and see what happens. (offer support to, try something)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘go’ (without) examples

  • go without (something)

1. A camel is well suited to desert conditions as it can go without water for extended periods of time. (abstain from, not use)

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘go’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf
phrasal verbs with 'get'

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Have you read the information page on phrasal verbs with ‘get’? Click here to read it before you try the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises.

Remember to register to get email updates.

 

phrasal verbs with 'get' exercisesComplete the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

Example:

Jane is  ___________ food poisoning and will be back at work soon.

(a) getting over      (b) got over      (c) getting on

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises

Complete the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises below by choosing the correct answer (a), (b) or (c) to test your knowledge of phrasal verbs.

1. I don’t mean to  _________ you but you really need to help more with the housework!

(a) getting at      (b) get away with      (c) get at

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

 

2. We must  _________ Sean that taking his education seriously is so important!

(a) get through to      (b) get at      (c) get over

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

3. It is shocking when people who commit serious crimes  _________ what they have done. Courts should be stricter.

(a) get over      (b) get away with      (c) get rid of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

4. If he doesn’t  _________ that report, he will never have it finished in time.

(a) gets on with      (b) get on with      (c) getting on with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

5. Don’t think you can   _________ doing the washing up. It’s your turn remember!

(a) be get out of      (b) getting out of      (c) get out of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)

 

6. It is important to  _________ colleagues in the workplace even if you don’t always agree on everything.

(a) get along with      (b) get over      (c) get at

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

7. I hate having to _________ any of my books, but I don’t just don’t have room for all of them.

(a) get rid off      (b) get rid of      (c) getting rid of

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (b)

 

8. It can be very difficult to  _________ a divorce but most people find happiness again.

(a) get over      (b) get rid of      (c) get away with

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (a)

 

 

9. John will be in Italy now. I wonder what he  _________ ?

(a) gets up to      (b) be getting up to      (c) is getting up to

click here to see the answer
Correct answer is (c)
phrasal verbs with 'get'

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

phrasal verbs with 'get'Phrasal verbs are made when we use a main verb with another word (or words) to change the meaning of the main verb.

There are lots of different phrasal verbs with ‘get’. We’ll cover some of the most useful ones in this lesson.

Note: Remember, as for all phrasal verbs, phrasal verbs with ‘get’ are best used in spoken English and informal written English. It is often best to avoid using them in formal writing and even in some formal spoken situations (for example, you should avoid using them in Part 3 of the IELTS speaking test).

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ examples

  • get up to
  • get on with (something)
  • get on with / get along with (someone)
  • get over (something)
  • get over (someone)
  • get rid of (something)
  • get through to (someone)
  • get out of (doing something)
  • get away with (something)
  • get at (someone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (up to) examples

  • get up to

1. What have you been getting up to lately? (do)

 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (on with) examples

  • get on with (something)

1. Well it’s been nice talking to you but I really must get on with my homework now. (continue something you’ve started)

 

  • get on with (someone) / get along with (someone)

2. I get on with Simon really well. We have so much in common. (have a good relationship)

Note: To express the same meaning, you can also say: I get along with Simon really well. We have so much in common.

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (over) examples

  • get over (something)

1. I have finally managed to get over this terrible flu. I’ve been sick for weeks but feel better now. (recover from)

 

  • get over (someone)

2. I don’t think she will ever get over James. She loved him so much. (recover emotionally from losing someone)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (rid of) examples

  • get rid of (something)

1. I need to get rid of a lot of my old clothes. They don’t fit me anymore. (dispose of)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (through to) examples

  • get through to (someone)

1. I have tried getting through to him, but he just won’t listen! (make someone understand an opinion / successfully explain)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (out of) examples

  • get out of (doing something)

1. I am going to try to get out of going to the meeting today. I’m so busy! (avoid doing something you don’t want to do)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (away with) examples

  • get away with (something)

1. I hope he doesn’t get away with breaking that window. He needs to be punished! (escape blame, punishment, or undesirable consequences)

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘get’ (at) examples

  • get at (someone)

1. I’m sure the new boss doesn’t like me. She is always getting at me! (repeatedly criticise)

Click here to try the phrasal verbs with ‘get’ exercises.

Treat an innocent person badly because you are tired or angry about something else – See more at: http://www.espressoenglish.net/18-phrasal-verbs-with-take/#sthash.Qcat5Mck.dpuf